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Good News For 4K Blu-ray
#1
http://www.homemediamagazine.com/high-de...tart-38350
Quote:A total of 45 Ultra HD titles have been released on Blu-ray Disc since March — and according to Home Media Magazine market research, consumers bought more than 228,000 discs as of June 24.

By comparison, Blu-ray Disc, launched in June 2006, moved just 57,000 units in the comparable time frame.

That’s not surprising, analysts say. Industry observers expect the rapid advance of Ultra HD — the much-ballyhooed new format that not only offers viewers four times the resolution of HD, but also includes high dynamic range (HDR), which produces brilliant highlights, vibrant colors and greater contrast on compatible displays — to trigger a resurgence in overall Blu-ray Disc sales, which already are tracking up 3% for the year in units and 6% in dollars, Home Media Magazine market research numbers show.
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#2
(09-17-2016, 09:20 PM)SteelCrysis Wrote: http://www.homemediamagazine.com/high-de...tart-38350
Quote:A total of 45 Ultra HD titles have been released on Blu-ray Disc since March — and according to Home Media Magazine market research, consumers bought more than 228,000 discs as of June 24.

By comparison, Blu-ray Disc, launched in June 2006, moved just 57,000 units in the comparable time frame.

That’s not surprising, analysts say. Industry observers expect the rapid advance of Ultra HD — the much-ballyhooed new format that not only offers viewers four times the resolution of HD, but also includes high dynamic range (HDR), which produces brilliant highlights, vibrant colors and greater contrast on compatible displays — to trigger a resurgence in overall Blu-ray Disc sales, which already are tracking up 3% for the year in units and 6% in dollars, Home Media Magazine market research numbers show.

This makes sense as people with HDR TVs want something to watch to see what they bought.

Although I bought a HDR tv, I think they're a long way from mainstream and may never catch on.

If OLED ever competes with them on price, they will lose, because even the best HDRs can't match OLED.

As long as decent HDRs carry a price premium that would allow a person to buy a larger 4k set they have an uphill battle.

As long as all delivered content is 1080p or lower they have an uphill battle.

As long as most movies are not released in HDR, they have ....well, you get it.
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#3
https://www.neowin.net/news/pioneer-reve...esktop-pcs
Quote:Pioneer has revealed plans to release the first ever Ultra HD Bluray drives for desktop PCs. In a recent press release, the digital entertainment company confirmed that two editions will be available from late Feburary: the BDR-S11J-BK and BDR-S11J-X models. As of yet, it appears the UHD Blu-ray drives will initially only be available in Japan.
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#4
https://www.extremetech.com/computing/24...urn-speeds
Quote:In order to play UHD Blu-rays, your system must support AACS 2.0 and Intel’s Software Guard Extensions (SGX). You’ll need software to play the disc itself (CyberLink has an updated software solution set to ship in the near future), and a GPU with HDMI 2.0a and HDCP 2.2 support. AACS 2.0 also has to be implemented within the GPU driver, and no current stand-alone GPU drivers have this functionality. Finally, you need a 4K TV with both HDMI 2.0a and HDCP 2.2 support as well.

This is a tall order. No Intel chips before Skylake support SGX, and just owning a Skylake board isn’t enough — many desktop boards never implemented the feature and don’t support it in UEFI. The HDCP 2.2 support requirement is also dodgy, since not every Intel board supports that standard, either.

In theory, the UHD Blu-ray playback situation should be better than the 4K streaming situation, since at least 6th and 7th-generation Core chips are both supported. In practice, it seems to be every bit as much of a muddle and a problem. Support is limited to specific SKUs and motherboards with particular features, and the dependence on integrated graphics for decode support means that you can’t use UHD Blu-ray with any Intel HEDT system (HEDT refers to Intel’s E-class chips — Sandy Bridge-E, Ivy Bridge-E, Haswell-E, etc).

For years, there’s been a push-pull between content pirates and the content production industry, with law-abiding fans generally caught in the middle. For years, the content consumption side of the business has warned that if technology became too draconian, people simply wouldn’t use it. That seems to be the point at which we’ve arrived. Given the snail-like speed of PC refresh cycles these days, 4K streaming support will take 3-5 years to establish itself in the market, while UHD Blu-ray playback may never happen at all, thanks to ridiculously strict requirements that block out entire swathes of the hardware market.

The BDR-SJ11-BK is expected to be priced at $193, while the BDR-S11J-X will be a $307 part. Both drives will be available in Japan in late February, and will likely make their way to the US thereafter.
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#5
More good news: https://hdguru.com/manufacturers-cue-up-...y-players/
Quote:The first such players rolled out just one year ago, and in the months since resulted in the shipment of some 300,000 Ultra HD Blu-ray models, which the Blu-ray Disc Association has estimated to be three times the rate of standard Blu-ray players at comparable points in their respective market roll outs.

At the end of 2016, 110 titles were available and nearly 20 million software units had sold. The BDA forecasts some 250 Ultra HD Blu-ray titles will be released in 2017 from leading studios including Sony Pictures, Warner Bros, Twentieth Century Fox, Lionsgate and Universal.

Meanwhile, the first Ultra HD Blu-ray titles supporting both the mandatory HDR10 and the voluntary Dolby Vision HDR formats are slated to begin rolling out this year from studios including: Universal, Warner Bros. and Lions Gate. Dolby said it is working with others as well. Additional companies have added Dolby Vision HDR support in televisions this year including: Sony, LeEco, Philips, TCL and Hisense, joining Vizio and LG, which started support for the format more than a year earlier.
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#6
I don't think physical media can succeed in the digital world.

Sony's own decision not to put a 4K Blu-ray in their PS4 Pro is telling.

While better, most people are lazy and/or cheap. The market for costly physical media is a tiny fraction of streamed.
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#7
http://4k.com/news/4k-uhd-hdr-blu-ray-di...-99-19276/
Quote:Since their first release at the beginning of 2016, 4K UHD Blu-ray discs have not only become much more numerous, they’ve also started to drop down in price sporadically, especially for titles that aren’t major new release Hollywood blockbusters. With the current tally of 4K HDR Blu-ray titles sitting at nearly 200 and continuing to expand for 2017, owners of 4K HDR TVs and Blu-ray media player platforms have a remarkably robust selection of content to choose from. For 4K TV owners who don’t have access to enough internet bandwidth for ultra HD content streaming from Netflix, this is a great way to enjoy the full power of high dynamic range combined with 4K resolution of a quality that even those awesome Netflix streams can’t quite match.

Of course, for the best possible enjoyment of 4K Blu-ray titles, your best bet will be an HDR TV and a 4K media player like the Xbox One S, Samsung UBD-K8500 or Sony’s new UBP-X800. All of these players cost between $400 and just under $300, so they’re still not exactly cheap either.

If however you’ve got all these things, the selections of low-priced 4K BD titles are fairly decent, with some decent selections available for less than $20, many more new release movies and shows for less than $25 and even some remarkably decent entertainment options selling for as little as $15 from sites like Best Buy and Amazon.com.
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#8
http://4k.com/news/4k-uhd-blu-ray-discs-...017-19884/
Quote:The 4K ultra HD Blu-ray disc format has become rather robustly and to some even surprisingly popular since its first introduction on the consumer market near the beginning of 2016. Buoyed in part by rapidly growing adoption of 4K televisions and growth in associated technologies like HDR, the still rather limited selection of 4K disc titles on sale today is selling briskly with predictions by the firm Futuresource Consulting that a total of 8.4 million units will be sold in 2017.

This of course represents only 4% of all Blu-ray disc sales worldwide and is a far cry from the sales figures for both HD Blu-ray and DVD disc formats at their peak but considering the still very limited number of titles available for the 4K HDR BD format, sales of this many units are quite robust indeed. For many consumers who own 4K TVs in areas without high-speed internet access, the medium is one of the few possible means of watching full-blown 4K movies with HDR integration without connectivity problems.

So far, approximately 110 Ultra HD Blu-ray titles exist on the market with releases of them shared among a small handful of studios that include 20th Century Fox, Lionsgate, Paramount, Sony and Warner Brothers. However, the Digital Entertainment Group is predicting that at least 250 titles will be available for purchase by consumers worldwide by the end of this year. Furthermore, since the 4K UHD Blu-ray format isn’t regionally locked in any way like HD Blu-ray is, buyers of discs anywhere can watch their movies from any 4K Blu-ray media player and 4K TV sold in the world as long as both have the correct HDMI connectivity and compression codec support standards (HDMI 2.0 and HEVC version H.265).
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The DEG also pointed to a very interesting trend for 4K Blu-ray adoption which sets the pace for this new content medium’s near future prospects: Specifically, that first-year sales data for 4K Blu-rays showed consumers embracing the format at a notably faster pace than was the case when HD Blu-rays and HD DVDs first came out several years ago.
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