Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Office Depot Falsely Diagnosing Malware
#1
https://www.neowin.net/news/office-depot...meet-sales
Quote:The store has a 'PC Health Check' service, which as the name implies, examines computers and diagnoses if they have any problems. While this might sound like a good thing, a whistleblower employee, Shane Barnett, spoke out.

“The PC Health Check doesn’t compute," he said. "If they actually did what they said and cared about customers they wouldn’t have started this program. Customers are unaware they are being taken advantage of.”

To investigate these claims, KIRO-TV took six computers in various Office Depot stores located in Washington and Oregon to have them examined in PC Health Checks. After the tests, the technicians determined that 4 out of 6 of the computers were showing signs of malware. After this, they attempted to sell protection services to the customer, which cost $199.99.

The only problem? The PCs used were fresh out of the box. Another test ran by an independent security firm, IOActive, didn't find any signs of malware on the six computers used.

Office Depot also purportedly posts sales goals and current employee sales for employees to see. This, according to Barnett, makes associates aggressive in pushing out bogus security plans for its customers.

“I refused to do it. They’re like, ‘You have to hit these numbers.’ I’m like, ‘I’m not going to make things up so you can hit your numbers. I’m not going to do it,’” Barnett said.

He adds that he and other employees have complained to Office Depot management about PC Health Check two years ago, but nothing was done to stop it.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#2
I saw that, horrible.

This is what the Corporate culture is now.

Very sad.
Reply
#3
(11-17-2016, 10:22 PM)dmcowen674 Wrote: I saw that, horrible.

This is what the Corporate culture is now.

Very sad.

This is not what corporate culture is now. This is one company, one region.

Might be what Office Max culture is, but it doesn't make it anyone else's.
Reply
#4
Come on, really.

OK, stick your head back in the sand.
Reply
#5
(11-18-2016, 09:48 AM)dmcowen674 Wrote: Come on, really.

OK, stick your head back in the sand.

Really.

I work for a fairly big corporation, do tech work that bills for a high rate, and give our clients alternatives to contracts with me regularly.

We're not out to squeeze every dime we can out of people, having them as references is the big picture.

I haven't gone rogue either, that is company policy.

I spoke with Sony tech support last night about my sound bar, didn't charge me a dime.

I spoke to Geek Squad about my Netgear Nighthawk earlier this year when the automatic bios update failed, have a year free.

I spoke to HBO Now tech support because my email was blocking their emails, no charge.

I've spoken to Sony's PS Vue tech support, free.

I've spoken to MS Live tech support free in the last few years.

I drove over a wood screw this summer and the garage I get my oil changed at fixed my tire for free, even though I bought my truck at another dealer.

This fall our landscaper (employee of a company came out and worked a couple hours free of charge.

Yes, I'm "sticking my head in the sand" all these corporations are trying to screw me for every dime they can.

Rolleyes

The sales quotas and "pushing" we've seen at Wells Fargo and Office Max are certainly not the only examples of companies making a dishonest buck, but you can't just say "This is current corporate culture. They're all out to swindle us!".

Some are, some are not, it's up to consumers to protect themselves.
Reply
#6
(11-18-2016, 06:17 PM)RolloTheGreat Wrote:
(11-18-2016, 09:48 AM)dmcowen674 Wrote: Come on, really.

OK, stick your head back in the sand.

Really.

I work for a fairly big corporation, do tech work that bills for a high rate, and give our clients alternatives to contracts with me regularly.

We're not out to squeeze every dime we can out of people, having them as references is the big picture.

I haven't gone rogue either, that is company policy.

I spoke with Sony tech support last night about my sound bar, didn't charge me a dime.

I spoke to Geek Squad about my Netgear Nighthawk earlier this year when the automatic bios update failed, have a year free.

I spoke to HBO Now tech support because my email was blocking their emails, no charge.

I've spoken to Sony's PS Vue tech support, free.

I've spoken to MS Live tech support free in the last few years.

I drove over a wood screw this summer and the garage I get my oil changed at fixed my tire for free, even though I bought my truck at another dealer.

This fall our landscaper (employee of a company came out and worked a couple hours free of charge.

Yes, I'm "sticking my head in the sand" all these corporations are trying to screw me for every dime they can.

Rolleyes

The sales quotas and "pushing" we've seen at Wells Fargo and Office Max are certainly not the only examples of companies making a dishonest buck, but you can't just say "This is current corporate culture. They're all out to swindle us!".

Some are, some are not, it's up to consumers to protect themselves.


The problem is clear and you will never see it because you view the world with Rose Colored glasses.
Reply
#7
(11-19-2016, 06:06 PM)dmcowen674 Wrote: The problem is clear and you will never see it because you view the world with Rose Colored glasses.

You need to read up on anecdotal (cherry picked) evidence and how just because something is true it may not be true for a population.

This is just like your stance on the police violence.

Yes there are some crooked businesses and there are some bad cops, no one doubts this.

However; you have no proof they are indicative of trends in the larger population. You assume they are because that is in line with your negative world view.
Reply
#8
Here is another example of Corporate wrongdoing that I'm sure you would deny is happening as well:

No -- I Won't Come Back For A Fifth Interview

Dear Liz,
I have been reading your columns with interest because I am job-hunting now. I thank you for opening my eyes to several “dirty tricks” in the recruiting process that I was not aware of before.
In the past, I always thought that as long as I could stay in the interviewing pipeline, I should do it because that meant I had a chance at the job. In this new job search that started when I got laid off in July, I saw things differently.

On my fourth interview they brought in lunch, and there were four executives sitting in the conference room. Two Directors and two VPs quizzed me for 90 minutes about the exact methods I used to set up a software quality testing program.

I declined to go back for a fifth interview and then my friend in the company, the one who got me the first interview, told me that the company had decided to go ahead and set up its quality program without hiring anyone to manage it. Of course!
Reply
#9
You're not hearing me.

I don't doubt that businesses and police people make mistakes and in some cases act in less than honorable fashion. That is obvious.

What I am saying is these isolated examples you post are not evidence the problems are widespread or even exist outside of your examples.

There are over a million corporations in the US and many businesses on top of that that are different structure for tax purposes.

Showing us a couple bad actors and saying, "There you have it. All corps are evil" doesn't cut it.
Reply
#10
More malice by America's largest Corporations that Rollo swears they are not doing:

11-22-2016

No Evidence of Aloe Vera Found in the Aloe Vera at Wal-Mart, CVS

The aloe vera gel many Americans buy to soothe damaged skin contains no evidence of aloe vera at all.

Samples of store-brand aloe gel purchased at national retailers Wal-Mart, Target and CVS showed no indication of the plant in various lab tests.

The products all listed aloe barbadensis leaf juice -- another name for aloe vera -- as either the No. 1 ingredient or No. 2 after water. There's no watchdog assuring that aloe products are what they say they are. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration doesn't approve cosmetics before they're sold and has never levied a fine for selling fake aloe. That means suppliers are on an honor system, even as the total U.S. market for aloe products, including drinks and vitamins, has grown 11 percent in the past year to $146 million, according to Chicago-based market researcher SPINS LLC. "You have to be very careful when you select and use aloe products," said Tod Cooperman, president of White Plains, New York-based ConsumerLab.com, which has done aloe testing.

Aloe's three chemical markers -- acemannan, malic acid and glucose -- were absent in the tests for Wal-Mart, Target and CVS products conducted by a lab hired by Bloomberg News. The three samples contained a cheaper element called maltodextrin, a sugar sometimes used to imitate aloe. The gel that's sold at another retailer, Walgreens, contained one marker, malic acid, but not the other two.
Reply
#11
Original title was wrong, but now OfficeMax is implicated as well: https://www.extremetech.com/computing/23...l-services
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)