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Zotac GTX 1080 Mini
#1
http://www.tomshardware.com/news/zotac-e...33279.html
Yay. It's about time we got a mini card that is just one step down from the top of the line. Edit: My mistake, the ASUS GTX 670 DirectCU Mini was one step down from the top of the line.
[Image: r_600x450.jpg]
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#2


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#3
https://www.techpowerup.com/229512/zotac...t-gtx-1080
It's under 20cm long.
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#4
And it's out: https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a...6814500414
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#5
its little but its cute
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#6
Still not mini enough for me.
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#7
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Zota...ni/27.html
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Zota...ni/34.html
Quote:Unfortunately, the Zotac GTX 1080 Mini lacks the idle-fan-off feature that has become standard on most graphics cards today. My guess is that Zotac was very concerned that the card could overheat in a hot, closed case.

Gaming noise levels are very high, too. The card is noisier than both the GTX 1080 and GTX 1080 Ti Founders Edition. Temperatures are extremely low with only 67°C, though, which is probably another safety measure for ITX systems.
...
Zotac's thermal solution builds upon a dual-slot, dual-fan approach it paired with a four heatpipe heatsink that also cools the memory chips and VRM circuitry. The cooler does a good job at keeping the card cool - there is no thermal throttling. Temperatures under heavy gaming reach 67°C, which should be sufficient headroom, even for smaller cases. Unfortunately, noise levels are quite high; the Zotac GTX 1080 Mini is actually the noisiest GTX 1080 we have tested. Zotac's card also lacks the idle-fan-off feature that provides the ultimate noise-free experience during light gaming, media playback, desktop work, and Internet browsing. I consider this feature essential for any modern graphics card, even more so for a card that's small form factor and could end up in a low-noise media PC. Idle temperatures are very good too; it seems Zotac was scared of the card overheating in small cases. But with the fans starting at a certain temperature if idle fan off were implemented, wouldn't they just turn on in such a situation? Zotac's official response is that it was not possible to place a microcontroller for the idle-fan-off feature on the PCB due to its compact footprint.
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The card is currently listed for $540 online even though its normal price is $515, which is probably due to some price inflation because of mining yet again. At that price point, the card is only marginally more expensive than the cheapest GTX 1080 you can find ($500). If you are in the market for a small form factor build, you should definitely consider this card, and maybe use a custom fan profile to make the fans stop in idle and media playback. If you are betting on the recently teased Radeon RX Vega Nano to be a big winner, I'm not sure if it'll be worth the wait. The card will almost certainly be more expensive than the Zotac Mini and will probably come with similar performance, if even that. Also, AMD's power efficiency is much worse than Pascal's, which either means tons of throttling at the cost of performance or higher temperatures and more noise, especially in a small case.
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