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Ryzen Release Thread
#41
Ryzen 5 lineup accidentally leaked by Guru3D: https://www.techpowerup.com/231519/amd-r...eup-leaked
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#42
Is this Barcelona all over again? https://www.techpowerup.com/231536/amd-r...structions

And Elric couldn't get his Ryzen build to run RAM faster than DDR4-2133:


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#43
Quote:An important point to note here is that this little known benchmark has been tailored by its developer to be highly specific to the CPU micro-architecture, with separate binaries for each major x64 architecture (eg: Bulldozer, Sandy Bridge, Haswell, Skylake, etc.), and as such the GitHub repository does not have a "Zen" specific binary.

I don't know that I'd call fail on a little used synthetic benchmark, that is coded to each CPU, cause for alarm.

I'd buy a Ryzen if I were in need of a CPU now just to support what they have done here.

I'm a real gamer, so my only display options are 3440 X 1440 or 4K, I don't really care what the 1080P I was using 15 years ago is running like.

AMD did something HUGE here:

They built something that exceeds intel in business apps (most of the market) and still does very well in gaming. (and more importantly to me, with enough juice to get up to the intel levels when high def gaming. I get that they aren't as good in general at gaming, but what they've done here is big.

It's a coup about equal to GStan's one man PC shop getting the worldwide IBM workstation contract instead of Dell.
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#44
We will see what happens with subsequent revisions of Ryzen, the first one is well under-baked IMO, and the chipset/motherboards are a disaster zone.

Business as usual for AMD: a day decade late and a dollar 5 billion dollars short....
Adam knew he should have bought a PC but Eve fell for the marketing hype.

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#45
Part of Ryzen is synced to the RAM speed: https://www.techpowerup.com/231585/amd-r...mory-speed
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#46
Non-X Ryzen CPUs have XFR as well, check the comments: http://www.kitguru.net/components/cpu/lu...review/12/

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/...0X/16.html
Quote:What I'd also like to mention is how unfinished the whole motherboard ecosystem feels. AMD sent me a Gigabyte Aorus motherboard with Corsair memory, so I assumed they properly tested that combination for optimum user experience. Not really. Once you setup the system, your memory will run at 2133 MHz, which is extremely low and will severely restrict performance in both application and games. You want to be running 2666 MHz at least. So, off I went into the BIOS, set 2666 MHz - nothing happened. The damn motherboard BIOS just didn't apply the memory frequency. At this point many novices would RMA the memory, or motherboard, or CPU or everything altogether, claiming "it doesn't work." The magic bullet (on my Gigabyte board at least) is that every single memory timing and memory voltage has to be configured to a manual value - not "auto" (this works fine on Intel of course, where you can leave most settings on auto, or just select "XMP3000," and boom ready to go). After this change the Gigabyte Ryzen board would boot at 2666 MHz memory and run fine all day. We got 3000 MHz memory though, so 2933 MHz was tried, and ended up being unstable, no matter what I did. I ended up buying a bunch of memory kits with same-day delivery, and oh wonder, the newly bought Corsair 3000 MHz memory kit works fine (AMD sent me the exact same model, but apparently never tested its 2933 MHz stability). Several 3200 MHz memory kits that work fine on Intel at even higher clocks, barely worked at 2666 MHz, and 2933 MHz remained a no-go. Once you've mastered the memory hurdles, you'll find various posts online by users, reviewers and AMD themselves, recommending you turn off HPET and SMT, use the Windows High Performance power profile and more tweaks. I'm not sure if this a solid buying argument to professional workstation users that just want a system setup quickly and ready to go, because every hour they spend tweaking costs them money.

Some people will now claim that it's not AMD's fault that the motherboards aren't ready. In my opinion it is. Why not give motherboard manufacturers all hardware and all support they need, with plenty of time to spare?

Despite the motherboard issues, overclocking the CPU itself works well (functionally), also thanks to AMD's Ryzen Master utility, where you can make changes in real-time and apply them without a reboot. On the 1800X model specifically I'm not sure if overclocking is worth it. AMD's Boost and XFR will work in tandem to maximize CPU performance automagically. For example, in workloads with few threads the CPU will boost up to 4.1 GHz, without any manual setting changes, a frequency that you'll probably not reach with manual overclocking unless you use watercooling or super-high voltage. Manual overclocking can still be beneficial for heavy workloads that use all cores, where XFR and Boost might not be active or running at lower frequencies.

For years Intel has spoon-fed us incremental improvements to their architecture, especially on the power efficiency side, claiming that their processors are reaching the climax of what is possible for x86 power-wise. Then in comes AMD Ryzen with a much lower R&D budget and at least matches, sometimes beating Intel power-efficiency, and often delivering better performance at the same time. Even with all its eight cores stressed with Prime95, the Ryzen 7 1800X draws just as much power as the quad-core i7-7700K.

If you compare Ryzen 7 1800X pricing to Intel's highest-end offerings, then AMD has a clear winner on their hands once the platform issues are ironed out. The 1800X comes at much better pricing with very similar performance. Looking at the Ryzen 7 lineup though I feel that most people will not need a 1800X and could probably go for the 1700 non-X, which is much more affordable with only little lower performance (we'll test this in a future review). If I were in the market for Ryzen personally, I'd wait till the platform is more mature, and the major bugs are fixed.
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#47
Ryzen 5 preview from AMD, note what looks like an old model of Cooljag's Everflow LED fans on the shelf:


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#48
https://www.techpowerup.com/231700/amd-m...s-for-june
Whoa. 16 cores, 32 threads.
[Image: Fjwswbz.jpg]
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#49
https://www.extremetech.com/computing/24...-skylake-x
Quote:Now, as for the rest of the rumor, it’s by no means impossible. AMD is already planning to build a 32-core Ryzen with 8 memory channels (one per CCX). A 16-core device could easily turn out to be a quad-channel part, and that would compete well against Intel’s HEDT lineup.

The one thing I’d caution against, however, is treating this rumor as if its either proof AMD will launch such a chip or that this kind of processor would be desirable to most enthusiasts. First, AMD will be required to cut clock speeds. The more cores you have, the lower your maximum clock is going to be. That’s always been true for server chips from both companies. Even allowing for some variation between product SKUs, higher core counts mean lower clock speeds or similar clock speeds at a substantially higher TDP. Intel’s E7-8894 v4 (24 cores) has a base clock of 2.4GHz and a boost clock of 3.4GHz in a 165W TDP. The E7-8891 v4 (10 cores) has a base clock of 2.8GHz and a boost of 3.5GHz in the same 165W power envelope.

Which of these CPUs is “better” depends entirely on how multi-threaded your workloads are, of course, but the trend holds clear. If AMD wants to build a 16-core Ryzen, even in a 150W TDP, it’s going to have to give up some clock speed to get there. It might make a fabulous workstation chip, but I’d bet you’d get better gaming performance from a different CPU in AMD’s lineup.

Would a 16-core Ryzen punch holes in Intel’s product family? Possibly. There is some concern that by joining that many CCX’s together, the relatively limited 22GB/s of bandwidth between the CCX’s could prove a scaling bottleneck with that many chips to handle. And it’s absolutely possible, even likely, that gamers would see little benefit from this kind of firepower. Games are typically designed to run on higher clocks with lower threads; few platforms can saturate threads to the point that they count for more than raw clocks.

Still, it’ll be interesting to see if this rumor proves true. Depending on what AMD pulls off, it might be able to regain market share, even at the highest end of the non-server market.
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#50
Linus simulated the performance of Ryzen 5 and 3, the results are looking good so far:


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#51
TechSpot did a similar analysis: http://www.techspot.com/review/1360-amd-...0x-gaming/
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#52
I can't remember, but I bet the first Conroe motherboards had issues as well. (and the main reason intel doesn't have issues now is they've been releasing slightly different chips for so many years)

Seems to me back in the day we had to install "3dNow" and "3 in 1" drivers and the like to fix platform issues with K6s.
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