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Ryzen Release Thread
#41
Part of Ryzen is synced to the RAM speed: https://www.techpowerup.com/231585/amd-r...mory-speed
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#42
Non-X Ryzen CPUs have XFR as well, check the comments: http://www.kitguru.net/components/cpu/lu...review/12/

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/...0X/16.html
Quote:What I'd also like to mention is how unfinished the whole motherboard ecosystem feels. AMD sent me a Gigabyte Aorus motherboard with Corsair memory, so I assumed they properly tested that combination for optimum user experience. Not really. Once you setup the system, your memory will run at 2133 MHz, which is extremely low and will severely restrict performance in both application and games. You want to be running 2666 MHz at least. So, off I went into the BIOS, set 2666 MHz - nothing happened. The damn motherboard BIOS just didn't apply the memory frequency. At this point many novices would RMA the memory, or motherboard, or CPU or everything altogether, claiming "it doesn't work." The magic bullet (on my Gigabyte board at least) is that every single memory timing and memory voltage has to be configured to a manual value - not "auto" (this works fine on Intel of course, where you can leave most settings on auto, or just select "XMP3000," and boom ready to go). After this change the Gigabyte Ryzen board would boot at 2666 MHz memory and run fine all day. We got 3000 MHz memory though, so 2933 MHz was tried, and ended up being unstable, no matter what I did. I ended up buying a bunch of memory kits with same-day delivery, and oh wonder, the newly bought Corsair 3000 MHz memory kit works fine (AMD sent me the exact same model, but apparently never tested its 2933 MHz stability). Several 3200 MHz memory kits that work fine on Intel at even higher clocks, barely worked at 2666 MHz, and 2933 MHz remained a no-go. Once you've mastered the memory hurdles, you'll find various posts online by users, reviewers and AMD themselves, recommending you turn off HPET and SMT, use the Windows High Performance power profile and more tweaks. I'm not sure if this a solid buying argument to professional workstation users that just want a system setup quickly and ready to go, because every hour they spend tweaking costs them money.

Some people will now claim that it's not AMD's fault that the motherboards aren't ready. In my opinion it is. Why not give motherboard manufacturers all hardware and all support they need, with plenty of time to spare?

Despite the motherboard issues, overclocking the CPU itself works well (functionally), also thanks to AMD's Ryzen Master utility, where you can make changes in real-time and apply them without a reboot. On the 1800X model specifically I'm not sure if overclocking is worth it. AMD's Boost and XFR will work in tandem to maximize CPU performance automagically. For example, in workloads with few threads the CPU will boost up to 4.1 GHz, without any manual setting changes, a frequency that you'll probably not reach with manual overclocking unless you use watercooling or super-high voltage. Manual overclocking can still be beneficial for heavy workloads that use all cores, where XFR and Boost might not be active or running at lower frequencies.

For years Intel has spoon-fed us incremental improvements to their architecture, especially on the power efficiency side, claiming that their processors are reaching the climax of what is possible for x86 power-wise. Then in comes AMD Ryzen with a much lower R&D budget and at least matches, sometimes beating Intel power-efficiency, and often delivering better performance at the same time. Even with all its eight cores stressed with Prime95, the Ryzen 7 1800X draws just as much power as the quad-core i7-7700K.

If you compare Ryzen 7 1800X pricing to Intel's highest-end offerings, then AMD has a clear winner on their hands once the platform issues are ironed out. The 1800X comes at much better pricing with very similar performance. Looking at the Ryzen 7 lineup though I feel that most people will not need a 1800X and could probably go for the 1700 non-X, which is much more affordable with only little lower performance (we'll test this in a future review). If I were in the market for Ryzen personally, I'd wait till the platform is more mature, and the major bugs are fixed.
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#43
Ryzen 5 preview from AMD, note what looks like an old model of Cooljag's Everflow LED fans on the shelf:


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#44
https://www.techpowerup.com/231700/amd-m...s-for-june
Whoa. 16 cores, 32 threads.
[Image: Fjwswbz.jpg]
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#45
https://www.extremetech.com/computing/24...-skylake-x
Quote:Now, as for the rest of the rumor, it’s by no means impossible. AMD is already planning to build a 32-core Ryzen with 8 memory channels (one per CCX). A 16-core device could easily turn out to be a quad-channel part, and that would compete well against Intel’s HEDT lineup.

The one thing I’d caution against, however, is treating this rumor as if its either proof AMD will launch such a chip or that this kind of processor would be desirable to most enthusiasts. First, AMD will be required to cut clock speeds. The more cores you have, the lower your maximum clock is going to be. That’s always been true for server chips from both companies. Even allowing for some variation between product SKUs, higher core counts mean lower clock speeds or similar clock speeds at a substantially higher TDP. Intel’s E7-8894 v4 (24 cores) has a base clock of 2.4GHz and a boost clock of 3.4GHz in a 165W TDP. The E7-8891 v4 (10 cores) has a base clock of 2.8GHz and a boost of 3.5GHz in the same 165W power envelope.

Which of these CPUs is “better” depends entirely on how multi-threaded your workloads are, of course, but the trend holds clear. If AMD wants to build a 16-core Ryzen, even in a 150W TDP, it’s going to have to give up some clock speed to get there. It might make a fabulous workstation chip, but I’d bet you’d get better gaming performance from a different CPU in AMD’s lineup.

Would a 16-core Ryzen punch holes in Intel’s product family? Possibly. There is some concern that by joining that many CCX’s together, the relatively limited 22GB/s of bandwidth between the CCX’s could prove a scaling bottleneck with that many chips to handle. And it’s absolutely possible, even likely, that gamers would see little benefit from this kind of firepower. Games are typically designed to run on higher clocks with lower threads; few platforms can saturate threads to the point that they count for more than raw clocks.

Still, it’ll be interesting to see if this rumor proves true. Depending on what AMD pulls off, it might be able to regain market share, even at the highest end of the non-server market.
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#46
Linus simulated the performance of Ryzen 5 and 3, the results are looking good so far:


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#47
TechSpot did a similar analysis: http://www.techspot.com/review/1360-amd-...0x-gaming/
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#48
I can't remember, but I bet the first Conroe motherboards had issues as well. (and the main reason intel doesn't have issues now is they've been releasing slightly different chips for so many years)

Seems to me back in the day we had to install "3dNow" and "3 in 1" drivers and the like to fix platform issues with K6s.
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#49
Ryzen 5 got released early, or it's AMD shills being given early access: https://www.techpowerup.com/231796/amds-...n-the-wild

16-core Ryzen rumored clocks: https://www.techpowerup.com/231798/amds-...-1-3-6-ghz
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#50
Ryzen overclocking is getting better, though it still has room for improvement:


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#51
Great video about why Ryzen 5 will not outperform Kaby Lake i5s in gaming:


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#52
Linus still can't get the RAM speed past DDR4-2666:


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#53
Ryzen 12-core/24-thread CPU sighted: https://www.techpowerup.com/231876/amd-r...are-sandra
Quote:The CPU itself is an engineering sample, coded 2D2701A9UC9F4_32/27_N. Videocardz did a pretty god job on explaining what the nomenclature means, but for now, we do know this sample seems to be running at 2.7 GHz Base, and 3.2 GHz Boost clocks (not too shabby for a 12-core part, but a little on the anemic side when compared to previous reports on a 16-Core chip from AMD that would run at 3.1 GHz Base and 3.6 GHz Boost clocks.) What seems strange is the program's report on the available cache. 8x 8 MB is more than double what we would be expecting, considering that these 12-core parts probably make use of a die with 3 CCX's with 4x cores each, which feature 8 MB per CCX. So, 3 CCX's = 3x 8 MB, not 8x 8 MB, but this can probably be attributed to a software bug, considering the engineering-sample status of the chip.
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#54
HardwareUnboxed did an experiment with Ryzen's cores: https://www.techpowerup.com/231873/amd-r...s-compared
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#55
https://www.techpowerup.com/231911/amd-1...ridge-dies
Quote:These could include 12-core and 16-core parts, and the picture is getting clearer with an exclusive report by Turkish tech publication DonanimHaber. The biggest revelation here that the 12-core and 16-core Ryzen processors will be multi-chip modules (MCMs) of two "Summit Ridge" dies. The 12-core variant will be carved out by disabling 1 core per CCX (3+3+3+3).

Another revelation is that the 12-core and 16-core Ryzen processors will be built in a new LGA package with pin-counts in excess of 4,000 pins. Since it's an MCM of two "Summit Ridge" dies, the memory bus width and PCIe lanes will be doubled. The chip will feature a quad-channel DDR4 memory interface, and will have a total of 58 PCI-Express gen 3.0 lanes (only one of the two dies will put out the PCI-Express 3.0 x4 A-Link chipset bus). The increase in core count isn't coming with a decrease in clock speeds. The 12-core variant will hence likely have its TDP rated at 140W, and the 16-core variant at 180W. AMD is expected to unveil these chips at the 2017 Computex expo in Taipei, this June, with product launches following shortly after.
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#56
https://www.techpowerup.com/231970/ashes...e-to-ryzen
It's safe to say that AMD is bribing Stardock. There's no other explanation for this.
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#57
http://techreport.com/news/31679/in-the-...1500x-cpus
Quote:Stay tuned for our full review April 11.
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#58
Ryzen BIOS updates can improve gaming performance, but it's not consistent between different motherboard manufacturers:


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#59
(03-30-2017, 07:37 PM)SteelCrysis Wrote: https://www.techpowerup.com/231970/ashes...e-to-ryzen
It's safe to say that AMD is bribing Stardock. There's no other explanation for this.

Are you seriously just now catching on to this?

Ashes has always been a sham
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#60
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-...014-8.html
Quote:One of the lessons learned during the Ryzen 7 launch was that AMD's temperature sensor output has its share of problems. The company configured some of the models to report an additional 20°C on top of the actual temperature in order to guarantee adequate cooling. We’re still puzzled by this choice.

Nevertheless, we're accepting it as reality and going all-out on cooling for Ryzen 5's introduction. Alphacool offers a modified version of an industrial compression cooler under the name "Eiszeit 2000 Chiller." It has a powerful pump, and it’s compatible with the usual 1/4" connectors, thus making the technology accessible to enthusiasts like us.

We’re cooling the processors by connecting an Alphacool Eiszeit XPX CPU block directly to the Eiszeit 2000 Chiller. The compression cooler’s reservoir has a capacity of almost eight liters, serving double duty as a storage tank and compensating reservoir. This provides a large thermal buffer. At 40L per minute, the flow rate is high enough for our purposes as well.
...
At first, we just wanted to see if we could explore how AMD's XFR feature behaved under perfect conditions, and how leakage current would compare to measurements taken with other cooling solutions. However, the first test run delivered a huge surprise:
At just under 17°C, the Ryzen 5 1500X’s reported Tctl temperature values at 19W total power consumption of the CPU package come in a full 3°C below the cooling fluid’s temperature of a constant 20°C!

We don’t really need to explain why these results can’t be correct. Consequently, we dug deep into our toolbox and found a liquid metal pad that was originally developed as a substitute for thermal paste. Our potent cooler kept the temperatures well below the pad’s melting point, so that it didn’t fuse with the processor’s heat spreader or the water block’s heat sink. We placed a thin strip between the heat spreader and the heat sink during our water-cooled measurements, making sure to cut the strip thin enough for it not to result in a measurable change in cooling performance. We used a tiny copper plate milled into a very thin strip for the stock cooler measurements.

The plan was simple: find the exact difference between the temperatures reported by the processor and the temperatures we measured for the processor’s heat spreader with the help of our constant cooling fluid temperature setup and infrared camera. Unfortunately, we found that the resulting differences between the temperature curves weren’t consistent and, consequently, still didn’t make any sense. There were two points at which the temperature curves changed drastically and clearly diverged from a linear pattern.

Based on these findings, we hypothesized that the behavior of the processors’ temperature sensors changed once certain temperature thresholds were reached. If this was the case, we could predict the sensors’ behavior for different temperature ranges and correct the temperature readings.

For our second round of testing, we compared the Tctl values to actual power consumption. A software tool developed in-house allowed us to generate different loads over long time periods, avoiding any jumps or delays that could skew the results. The tool would do its best to spread the loads equally across all possible threads. The results proved our previous hypothesis:
The reported temperatures are complete nonsense below ~20 to 25W. It’s also plain to see that there are significant differences between the Tctl reporting patterns of AMD’s Ryzen 5 and 7.
In general, we saw that upwards of 20 to 22W, there was a difference of approximately 4 to 6°C between AMD’s Ryzen 5 and 7 when using our cooling solution with its constant fluid temperature. The Ryzen 5 processors’ sensors consistently displayed higher temperature readings than the Ryzen 7 processors at the same power consumption level!

The additional 20°C that AMD builds into some of its Ryzen processor models are already taken into account in this calculation.


One more thing to consider is the potential difference in heat transfer between components for our particular cooling solution. Plugging in numbers based on our experience and then comparing the final figures to our infrared measurements yields the following results for the three wattage ranges:
Across the entire wattage range, the Ryzen 5 produces a difference of approximately 8°C. That's pretty significant. We ran several control tests and got the same results every time.

The next question is whether Ryzen 5's temperature displays too high, or if Ryzen 7 is too low by 4 to 6°C.

The following graph shows the CPU heat spreader’s temperatures over a time period of approximately 30 minutes in degrees Celsius. The Ryzen 7 1800X’s leakage current is approximately 58 to 60W. Comparing that to the curve in the graph above shows that Tctl and heat spreader temperatures should not be the same. The expected difference of approximately 3 to 5°C between the Tctl and heat spreader temperatures is reached by the Ryzen 5 1500X, though. These finding are consistent with what we thought.
The tentative bottom line seems to be that all Ryzen 7 processors report their temperatures as being approximately 4 to 6°C lower compared to the two Ryzen 5 processors at the same leakage current level.

The bend in the curve at approximately 50W becomes more interesting once we get to the gaming power consumption results. The smaller CPUs may stay in this range during gaming, which means that it might be beneficial to take our results into account when setting fan curves. Most people don’t have a compression cooler at home, after all. The lower your cooling performance, the more important it is to change sensor characteristics!

We measured the Ryzen 5 1500X with AMD's stock air cooler to illustrate our point further. Its fan was set to a fixed speed we chose after first running a stress test. The curve's two bends are easy to see in spite of the curves being much steeper. A closer look shows that the total power consumption increased by approximately 5W. This is due to increased leakage currents that accompany the much higher temperatures.

We stay with the temperature results a little while longer and take a look at all of the Ryzen processors’ temperatures. These are corrected for the temperature differences due to the three wattage ranges and the two processor lines.

Here’s a computational example for the Ryzen 7 1800X during the stress test:

67°C (Tctl, Sensor) - 20°C (AMD Ryzen Offset) + 4°C (Additional Offset for Ryzen 7) = 51°C

If you feel confused by all of this, then you’re certainly in good company. Nobody knows what prompted AMD to take the approach it did. If we didn’t use our offsets, then Ryzen 7 would be much cooler than Ryzen 5 at the same level of leakage current, which is physically impossible.

Before we close, we’d like to point out one more time that the temperature differences and offsets only apply to our particular test setup. Different hardware may very well affect behave some other way. The general principle shouldn’t change, though. A final judgement can’t be reached before these – admittedly elaborate – measurements have been repeated with a wide variety of setups.

Doing this just wasn’t possible under the time constraints of a product launch. The measurements took us three days for just the one setup.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-...14-11.html
Quote:Due to its identical clock rates, AMD's Ryzen 5 1600X demonstrates similar performance as the Ryzen 7 1800X in lightly-threaded content creation and productivity tests. The 1600X also outpaces the Ryzen 7 1700 in a great many scenarios where its higher frequency weighs heavier than its core count deficit. This makes the 1700 a tougher sell.

Intel’s Kaby Lake-based processors beat Ryzen 5 1600X in lightly-threaded applications where they can leverage superior IPC throughput. But the 1600X’s extra cores/threads turn the tables in software well-optimized for multi-core CPUs. Surprisingly, the 1600X even rivals the 1700X in certain scenarios. That paints a pretty convincing picture for a budget workstation chip, especially in light of the incredible price-to-performance ratio compared to Intel’s Broadwell-E line-up.

The Ryzen 5 1600X also makes a compelling argument against purchasing the 1700 for your next gaming PC. Six nimble cores regularly match or beat AMD's budget-oriented eight-core model. It'd be easy to speculate that, due to the 1600X’s lower core count, less inter-CCX traffic unburdens the Infinity Fabric and provides more competitive performance. We'll explore this in more depth later. For now, we think it's safe to say there's little reason for enthusiasts to splurge on the higher-end Ryzens for gaming, especially when the dual-CCX die overclocks similarly, regardless of configuration.

But don't forget the Core i5-7600K. It's a capable gaming processor. And although the 1600X challenges it in much of our benchmark suite, the Core i5 still comes out on top at stock settings. Further, overclocking Kaby Lake opens up a sizeable advantage that AMD cannot overcome, given limited frequency headroom. We expect Ryzen's overclocking potential to improve as GlobalFoundries' 14nm process evolves, but Intel's isn't sitting by idly, either.

AMD is still working on improving the utilization of Ryzen 5's resource-rich architecture, and a few gaming titles make it apparent that this is still a work in progress. We’ve seen several developers come forward with Ryzen-specific patches, and if AMD's gets its wish, more will follow suit. In the meantime, AMD developed its own Windows power profile to combat the performance issues we observed back when Ryzen 7 launched. Unfortunately, some of the other workarounds we played with may not apply as universally to Ryzen 5. For instance, disabling SMT on the 1600X resulted in choppy frame delivery, apparent in our frame time charts.

At least overclocking is allowed on inexpensive B350-based motherboards. This makes Ryzen 5 a much better value than Broadwell-E, arguably superior to Ryzen 7 for mainstream gamers, and at least competitive with Kaby Lake. As shown in our Infinity Fabric-oriented tests, though, you'll want a fast memory kit to achieve the best gaming performance.

Ryzen 5 1600X provides a tremendous price-to-performance ratio for budget workstations, rivaling Core i7-6800K. It also facilitates playable performance in games (though it still lags Kaby Lake-based Core i5s more often than not). Considering what Intel charges for its Core i5-7600K, we'd certainly like Ryzen 5 1600X a lot more for gaming if it debuted at a lower price. Much of the Ryzen tapestry is woven using value as its thread. But it's hard to keep that story together when Ryzen 5 1600X sells for $249 and Core i5-7600K goes for $240. With that said, professionals on a budget are far more likely to jump on a potent six-core chip like the 1600X when it's able to beat the $450 Core i7-6800K.
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#61
http://techreport.com/news/31826/ryzen-c...al-q1-2017
Quote:AMD reported its financial results for the first quarter of 2017 today. Despite an 18% year-over-year increase in revenue to $984 million, the company still reported an operating loss of $29 million. AMD further recorded a net loss of $73 million for the quarter.

The Computing and Graphics division hauled in $593 million of that revenue after the launch of the Ryzen 7 and Ryzen 5 CPU lineups. That figure is up an impressive 29% year-over-year, and the company said it led to a better-than-expected sequential seasonal decline. Client-product average selling prices were up both year-on-year and sequentially, a change the company attributes to higher desktop processor ASPs. Still, the division lost $15 million, although that figure is down from $70 million a year ago.
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#62
https://www.techpowerup.com/232955/amd-i...yzen-sales
I don't know if this will be long-term, but it's an encouraging sign so far.
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#63
http://techreport.com/news/31863/upcomin...erformance
Quote:As we and other sites have demonstrated, using fast memory can result in a significant performance boost on systems with AMD's Ryzen processors. It can be a trying task to actually get your Ryzen rig to make use of fancy overclocker memory, though. AMD's 1.0.0.4 AGESA microcode update seemed to help matters somewhat, and some users reported improved memory speeds after that update. Now we have word—by way of a Gigabyte employee's forum posts—that AGESA update 1.0.0.5 is on its way with further improvements for memory compatibility.

Gigabyte rep Matt posted in the company's forums last Wednesday confirming that the company is working hard to use the new AGESA microcode in its BIOS updates to help improve its AM4-platform motherboards. The new updates should include fixes to IOMMU support, "soft brick" issues, and the ability for the CPU to enter lower power states when it's overclocked. Matt stated that the firmware updates would include AMD's latest AGESA microcode version 1.0.0.6. However, last Friday he posted in the same thread correcting himself and stating that the AGESA update would be version 1.0.0.5.

Either way, he says that the microcode update should enable access to "20+ memory registers" in the Ryzen CPUs' memory controller, and that the change should improve memory compatibility. It seems unlikely to us that these registers were actually disabled, but perhaps they were locked down and unavailable for modification. Matt says the BIOS updates for Gigabyte's boards should be available this week.

It's fairly safe to assume that Gigabyte isn't the only company readying BIOS updates with the new AGESA microcode. Asus, MSI, and all the other manufacturers are certainly working hard on new firmware as we speak.
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#64
(05-03-2017, 03:06 AM)SteelCrysis Wrote: https://www.techpowerup.com/232955/amd-i...yzen-sales
I don't know if this will be long-term, but it's an encouraging sign so far.


this article is totally misleading. The headline and graph are truly concerning. The article uses data from passmark statistics, hardly scientific. Its just strange to see this crap, its misleading and not accidentally.
there is a real attempt here and what a shame.
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#65
https://www.techpowerup.com/233333/amd-r...eup-leaked
Quote:Today is an eventful day in the tech world, with two high-impact leaks already offering themselves up to our scrutiny. We had previously covered AMD's upcoming HEDT platform, based on the company's new X399 chipset, as having a quite distinctive lineup of processors, with not only 16 and 12-core offerings hot on foundries presses', but also some 14-core, 28-thread chips as well. Now, a leak has apparently revealed the entire Ryzen HEDT platform, whose processor marketing name, Ryzen 9, sounds really close to Intel's Core i9.

AMD's offerings look to offer an edge at least on core-count, with the Red team's top offerings, the Ryzen 9 1998X and Ryzen 9 1998, bringing in a game-changer 16 cores and 32 threads to the table. Perhaps even more importantly, we have to mention that the 1998X (these names, if true, are quite a mouthful, though) achieves a 3.5 GHz base, 3.9 GHz boost clock, which owes nothing to AMD's Ryzen 7 1800X consumer flagship CPUs. Rumors of AMD's frequency demise on higher core-count Ryzen CPUs have been greatly exaggerated, it would seem. And did I mention that these chips are coming with a TDP of 155 W - 5 W lower than Intel's purported 12-core, i9-7920X offering? Consider that for a moment.
[Image: db1bc32bafd3.jpg]
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#66
ASUS accidentally reveals Ryzen 3: https://www.techpowerup.com/233359/asus-...zen-3-cpus
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#67
http://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-thr...34423.html
Quote:To start the show, AMD CEO Lisa Su unveiled the new EPYC data center processor. EPYC appears to be the new branding for the Naples data center processors that AMD announced last year. These 32-core/64-thread processors support 128 PCIe 3.0 lanes, and AMD has designed them specifically to interact well with its Vega GPUs.

Su noted that the copious PCIe connectivity will allow the dual-socket server platforms to support more GPUs than Intel's competing products. The processors support eight memory channels per socket, for a total of 16 DDR4 channels and 32 DIMMs in a two-socket server (up to 4TB of memory).

AMD also displayed EPYC with the heatspreader removed, and we spotted four 8-core Zeppelin die on a single package (MCP). These four die are glued together with AMD's Infinity Fabric.

AMD also announced its Threadripper CPUs for the high-end desktop segment. These 16-core/32-thread processors will debut this summer, but the company didn't provide any further details. Pricing will play an important role, but frankly, 16 cores is plenty exciting. Intel's 10-core/20-thread i7-6950X Broadwell-E weighs in at $1,700, and considering AMD's Ryzen pricing history, we can expect a much lower price point than that to get more cores.
...
AMD announced that the Ryzen Mobile products will feature on-die Vega graphics, which is a great indicator that we can expect Vega integrated graphics on the forthcoming APUs, as well.

AMD also provided a few rough details, such as 50% more CPU performance than the 7th-generation (A-Series) APUs and 40% more GPU performance. AMD also claimed that they'll consume 50% less power, which is attractive for the mobile segment.

Finally, as encouraging as many of the announcements are, AMD has more to come. The company divulged that it will debut its Zen 3 products on Global Foundries' second-generation 7nm+ process in 2020. The first generation 7nm process will obviously debut in the interim, but the company did not provide a firm timeline for it.
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#68
Oh yes, there's also Ryzen Pro, it's also in the Tom's link: https://www.techpowerup.com/233386/amd-a...rkstations
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#69
https://www.techpowerup.com/233486/asus-...rog-laptop
Quote:ASUS, through its ROG (Republic of Gamers)brand, has started teasing what is to be one of the first Ryzen-powered gaming laptops. Other than Ryzen's circular orange logo and the ROG brand, the video doesn't offer any specifics of what hardware rests under the hood. The clip includes the words "something has awakened," and the post is accompanied by the hashtag #Computex2017.

There are a number of things this teaser could mean. Ryzen and Vega-powered APUs aren't expected for some time, but this could be a teaser for an advance announcement for such a product taking place in Computex. The other, more likely scenario, is that ASUS will be making use of AMD's recently-announced Ryzen mobile solutions, though this would mean launch of this laptop will take place closer to the end of the year.
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#70
https://www.techpowerup.com/233476/amd-t...timization
RAM improvements, confirmation that the reason Ryzen doesn't do so well at 1080p is because of being CPU limited, Mini-ITX boards will be more available in the future, and Ryzen 3-series is coming.
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#71
https://www.techpowerup.com/233494/threa...re-details
Threadripper is confirmed to be a brand name.

AMD could build a new generation of Ryzen CPUs on 14nm before Zen2 arrives on 7nm: https://www.techpowerup.com/233495/amd-r...nm-process
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#72
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/...00/21.html
Quote:The 1400 is the first Ryzen part that doesn't do justice to the innovation AMD put into these chips, which leaves a bad taste in the mouth. The unlocked multiplier which lets you pull it up to 1500X performance is its only redeeming feature.
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