Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Ryzen Release Thread
#81
https://www.techpowerup.com/234476/amd-r...ge-silicon
Quote:AMD is readying a new stepping of its 14 nm "Summit Ridge" eight-core CPU silicon, which powers its socket AM4 Ryzen processors, according to Canard PC. The new B2 stepping reportedly addresses a lot of hardware-level errata which cannot be fixed merely by AGESA updates. According to Canard PC, the changes seem to be focused on the uncore components of "Summit Ridge." Typically, uncore refers to the integrated northbridge, which includes components such as the memory controllers, PCI-Express root complex, etc.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#82
http://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-epy...34833.html
Quote:AMD has identified the single-socket server as a potential high-growth market. Roughly 25% of two-socket servers have only one socket populated, so offering a capable single-socket platform reduces unnecessary redundancies (such as sockets, networking components, and power supplies), thus saving on up-front cost, power, space, and cooling expenses. AMD feels it has an advantage in this burgeoning space due to EPYC's hefty allotment of I/O, memory bandwidth, and memory capacity. As such, the company created three single-socket SKUs that feature the same connectivity options and a TDP range of 155W-180W. We also noticed that the highest frequency of the lineup was at 2.4GHz on the 7351P.

Again, these value comparisons are derived from a data set that AMD adjusted to remove what it considers an unfair advantage.

...
What use is all of the fancy technology if it isn't secure? Well...none. To that end, AMD has a robust set of security features that are all controlled by a sandboxed ARM processor on the SoC package. This separates the security apparatus from the host operating system/hypervisor and provides hardware-based memory encryption, which is useful in multi-tenancy environments, among other features.

AMD's re-entrance into the server market brings about understandable concerns about the ecosystem. At the end of the day, most will purchase systems from OEM providers, and administrators expect rock-solid support with enterprise-class applications. AMD's been hard at work on the enablement front and has amassed a solid set of launch partners for both hardware and software.

AMD has also developed a robust set of features that should further its objectives in the data center. The company noted that it designed the architecture from the ground up for data center workloads, which isn't a surprising admission. AMD's reentrance into the server market will be a long process, which company representatives have repeatedly acknowledged, but it does look promising.


Four of the high-end SKUs, along with several OEM systems, are available today. The remainder of the product stack, and further expansion of OEM's servers, comes in July.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#83
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/...ure/8.html
Quote:AMD has robust industry relations with the game-console manufacturers and has monopolized semi-custom SoC manufacturing for that market segment. It also pushed the software industry for favorable yet open standards, which its client hardware is inherently good at. The company must now direct its efforts towards building similar industry relationships with the most popular server OEMs, who not only make products based on EPYC, but also allocate their own marketing budgets to promoting EPYC-powered solutions to their longstanding or prospective customers. The onus is also on AMD to ensure that EPYC chips live up to the reliability standards the industry has come to expect of competing Xeon chips, and to provide a robust after-sales support net to customers.

AMD must also nurture a vibrant ecosystem built around EPYC, which includes not just hardware and OEMs marketing them, but also the matter of pioneering software standards in the enterprise segment. This must include not just open- and open-source standards, but proprietary ones from the likes of Microsoft or Novell. Fortune 500 companies need to know that EPYC-powered machines can be relied upon to power their businesses. AMD should also build the brand in the high-performance compute (HPC) arena with turnkey solutions that combine its enviable GPGPU leadership with its homebrew EPYC processors. We're inclined to think NVIDIA isn't fooling around by investing billions of dollars into machine-learning, and AMD is in a position to combine its CPU, GPU, and software resources into uniform and reliable solutions driven by open standards. The PC and server CPU industry dominated by Intel is finally getting a much needed shakedown, and it will only benefit the industry at large.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#84




Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#85
AMD is claiming a 28% improvement in Rise of the Tomb Raider on Ryzen: https://community.amd.com/community/gami...-customers
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#86
https://www.extremetech.com/computing/25...en-3-chips
Quote:This confirms some of the rumors we’ve seen around Ryzen 3 as well, assuming AMD keeps parity between the pro and consumer variants. The Ryzen 3 chips will be native quad cores compared with the Core i3’s dual-core + Hyper-Threading configuration.

It’s less clear how this will impact performance. Intel’s single-threaded perf is still a bit higher than AMD’s, clock-for-clock, but AMD’s SMT implementation has generally given it a larger boost than Intel gains from Hyper-Threading. It’ll be quite interesting to see how the two compare here, since AMD will still have a physical core advantage, but not the SMT implementation that has made chips like the Ryzen 5 1600X able to punch well above their weight class.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#87
Ryzen 3 coming in Q3: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/ryzen-p...34907.html
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#88
http://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-ryz...34926.html
Quote:Just in time for the Fourth of July, AMD's Ryzen 5 1600 rocketed from the No. 5 spot on Amazon's bestselling CPU list to the second place position over the weekend, unseating Intel's Core i5-7600K. Amazon's best seller list is hardly indicative of overall market share--a multitude of other factors complicate the issue--but it serves as a somewhat decent indicator of the state of the upgrade market.

First, the caveats. Amazon updates its list of bestselling CPUs hourly, so the results change frequently. We keep an eye on the list and also monitor price changes, and based on our casual observations over the last month (we haven't charted the progress, and we don't have access to historical data) the Ryzen 5 1600 has frequently occupied the 6th place position. That changed recently as the Ryzen 5 1600 moved up to displace the Intel Core i5-7600K, the long-running second-place processor. Intel's Core i7-7700K still enjoys the leading spot.

That move up is an encouraging sign for the Ryzen lineup. Intel has stood resolute in its current pricing scheme for Kaby Lake processors, but more competition might change the company's calculus.
...
Passmark posts quarterly updates that outline the number of benchmark submissions the company has received, and AMD submissions have jumped impressively. Due to an incredibly misleading chart and article title, many mistake the results as an indicator of Ryzen's market share. The results do not represent actual sales figures, and certainly do not represent market share.

Passmark's original chart showed that submissions with AMD systems rose from 20.6% the previous quarter to 31%. That's a jump of 10.4%.

However, an unexplained update to the chart lowers the percentage to 26.6%, which is a 6% increase. In either case, that is the largest single-quarter increase Passmark has recorded from either vendor since it began tracking in Q1 2004. The incredible rise in submissions may not be indicative of actual market share, but it does indicate that something is happening, and any jump is a positive development.

We've included a quick breakdown of the numbers behind Passmark's chart at the end of the article.

We headed over to Steam's hardware survey to see how AMD is doing on the gaming front, at least on the dominant online gaming platform.

Admittedly, we didn't expect to see a reduction. According to Steam's hardware survey, AMD systems have declined by 0.85% over the last several months. We dove into Steam's more detailed data, which breaks down the users by frequency range (windows), to attempt to ascertain if the changes just represent old AMD systems that gamers are retiring. Oddly, the reductions seem to be pretty steady across the board. It's certainly conflicting information compared to other indicators, but we have to remember this survey isn't an active tracker.


There's no doubt that AMD's new lineup is changing the status quo for desktop processors, particularly in the pricing department. It isn't surprising to see the Ryzen 5 1600 enjoying success; it has a great price point and solid performance trends that merited its recent inclusion in our Best Gaming CPUs recommendations. AMD's processors might not lead in gaming performance, but the price to performance ratio is impossible to ignore.

The company has already gained significant traction in the mid-range, but it's only the beginning. AMD has even more models, including the highly anticipated ThreadRipper, coming to market later this month. That could change the paradigm on the high-end desktop market while the Ryzen 3 squeezes the low end. Mobile processors also make up roughly two-thirds of the processor pie, and AMD hasn't released its mobile variants yet.

It appears that Intel has responded, at least partially, by lowering prices for its mid-range Skylake-X models (compared to the previous generation). Unfortunately, the company hasn't changed pricing on its existing mid-range processors. Perhaps we'll see a reaction when Intel releases Cannonlake later this year.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#89
https://www.techpowerup.com/234974/amd-t...oft-sandra
Quote:Interestingly, the single core performance dropped a bit on GeekBench, from 4216 to 4074. It made up for it in multi-threading however, where the chip posted a result of 26768, up from 24723. Sadly, these numbers still pale in comparison to the 10-core i9-7900X, in both single threaded and multi-threaded figures. As the 1950X ships with significantly lower clocks compared to the i9-7900X's clocks (with boost considered, anyway), I suppose it truly will come down to whether these CPUs can close the gap via overclocking, or optimizations towards launch and beyond. Either way, it seems there may be a bit of a hill to climb to get there. Whether or not it is surmountable remains to be seen.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#90
https://www.techpowerup.com/235092/intel...slide-deck
W1zzard is convinced that Intel is trash-talking AMD. I'll let the readers judge for themselves.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#91
Ryzen 3 coming July 27: http://techreport.com/news/32239/ryzen-3...es-july-27
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#92
http://wccftech.com/amd-ryzen-rma-fraud-on-amazon/
Quote:What seems like a very well organized mass-RMA fraud is seeping through the cracks over at Amazon. In a very short period of time, two users have so far reported receiving a fake Ryzen processor and both have indicators of being orchestrated by the same person(s). While Amazon did offer both of them refunds and even a gift card, these type of scams might turn away first timers who want to try the PC-building experience and even lead to damaged motherboards in some cases (which Amazon will probably not cover).
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#93
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/inte...,5125.html
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/inte...125-4.html
Quote:One presentation stuck out more than the rest. Intel presented a deck that outlined what it considers to be its advantages against AMD’s EPYC CPUs. The slides generated a lot of controversy over the last week, but they haven't been presented in context. We’re going to fix that.
...
AMD's lack of gaming optimization at launch was cited by Intel as an indicator that EPYC would begin its life similarly flat-footed, necessitating a similar optimization period for enterprise-oriented apps. Of course, that's an odd claim, in our opinion, considering Intel's statements to us about the impact of Skylake-X's mesh on some games:
...
Core i9-7900X uses the same core and mesh design as the Intel Scalable Processor family, so it's easy to contend that these same issues might affect Intel's Purley processor in some workloads.

The final slide includes Intel's summation of its talking points, and the company stated, again, its key concept that "not all cores are created equal."

It's easy to see why the slides are generating controversy. Taken in context, Intel's claims do have some technical merit that we'll have to explore in more detail. But other points are more educated guesses than definitive conclusions.

In other areas, Intel may have simply spoken too soon. VM interoperability, for instance, may be a challenge for AMD at first. However, we've since learned that the company is already partnering with the major hypervisor vendors. This may help smooth over any performance issues before EPYC goes on sale. While it's true that AMD doesn't have an ecosystem to match Intel's, EPYC is collecting quite the list of supporters. It's possible that Intel also underestimated EPYC's management features.

Many consider the glued-together desktop die messaging to be ill-conceived from a company that also repurposes enterprise silicon for desktop PCs. It could be argued that AMD designed its Zeppelin die for data centers, an opinion we've voiced several times, and uses the same tactic of sharing it with the desktop models.
...


It's interesting that Intel did not focus on AMD's comparatively higher TDPs during its workshop. That is one of the most important concerns in the data center, as greater efficiency reduces total cost of ownership. Early testing indicates EPYC processors may have competitive power attributes, despite their higher TDP ratings, likely due to fine-grained power optimizations.

Intel is usually nonplussed in the face of competition. But its reaction to EPYC speaks volumes. In the end, absolute performance isn't nearly as important as the price-to-performance ratio, and initial signs indicate that AMD is off to a good start. AMD has scrapped its way through the last several years selling mostly budget parts, so any market gains are a win. Significant data center penetration could be a watershed moment for the company and fuel more investment in future products.

Conversely, Intel already delivers compelling performance, and its mature ecosystem will be hard for AMD to outshine. But the industry is pining for a suitable low-cost alternative, and if AMD's EPYC delivers, Intel's strengths might not be able to hold it off.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#94
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/over...16-13.html
Interesting. According to this, Ryzen CPUs are binned, with Ryzen 5s being cut-down Ryzen 7s, and the best dies going to the Ryzen 7 1800X.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#95
(07-17-2017, 10:35 PM)SteelCrysis Wrote: http://wccftech.com/amd-ryzen-rma-fraud-on-amazon/
Quote:What seems like a very well organized mass-RMA fraud is seeping through the cracks over at Amazon. In a very short period of time, two users have so far reported receiving a fake Ryzen processor and both have indicators of being orchestrated by the same person(s). While Amazon did offer both of them refunds and even a gift card, these type of scams might turn away first timers who want to try the PC-building experience and even lead to damaged motherboards in some cases (which Amazon will probably not cover).

Always check the box seals. If it is broken or the box looks like someone has tried to open it then you return the product right then and there. A legitimate retailer has no reason whatsoever to break any seals or open the packaging.
Adam knew he should have bought a PC but Eve fell for the marketing hype.

Homeopathy is what happened when snake oil salesmen discovered that water is cheaper than snake oil.

The reason they call it the American Dream is because you have to be asleep to believe it. -- George Carlin
Reply
#96
Ryzen 7 1700 undervolts well, and can be passively cooled:





http://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/2993-a...ing/page-2
Quote:In this way, Intel’s CPU has now become the “project car” product. AMD Ryzen started its life as a project car – the product you buy because you’re OK with being under the hood a few hours a day, just to get the thing running perfectly. Now, with Ryzen’s initial launch issues somewhat smoothed out (but not completely), the CPU is holding well in streaming performance with minimal out-of-box tweaks. To get the 7700K to hold performance, we need quality tweaks, overclocks, and other “under the hood” modifications.

Our testing is by no means fully definitive of all approaches to streaming, but we can draw at least some firm conclusions based on the numbers we’ve collected thus far. Right now, today, Intel’s 7700K is getting crushed by the R7 1700 in our DiRT Rally test stream. The field levels a bit with DOTA2, but requires playing with process priority and forces Intel up against a wall. DOTA2, as a reminder, leans heavily on higher frequencies and isn’t as abusive as most other games on the market.

For game streamers – people who hope to live-stream output while simultaneously using the same host CPU to play/render their content – we absolutely recommend the R7 over the ~$300 class i7 CPUs. We’d recommend the R7 approach for folks who wish to avoid using NVENC for their livestream encoding. For professional streamers who absolutely must hold both tight frame latencies and quality stream output, we’d still recommend a dedicated capture box. The low-end frametimes drop with live encoding on the system, producing variable frametimes (0.1% lows, in our metrics) that can impact the experience for professionals concerned about framerate/frametimes in CSGO or DOTA2, for example. This is likely a non-issue for a lot of the more casual streamers or for people less concerned about high framerate consistency, but may matter for ultra-competitive players in an environment where money exchanges hands for shooting first. In those scenarios, a stream box fixes the latency challenge.

If that’s not a concern – and it may well not be one – then the R7s get our recommendation over the i7-7700K presently, hands-down, based on today’s testing. The R7 1700 didn’t need an overclock to produce its consistent stream output while maintaining relative gaming performance (“relative” because, like the 7700K, we still see reduced frametime consistency). Overclocking would further bolster numbers, of course, but may end up being unnecessary for most folks. We’d still recommend the 1700 over the 1700X or 1800X, purely because a simple OC gets any 1700 within range of both alternatives. The money can be put toward something else, like RAM.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#97
https://www.techspot.com/review/1450-cor...page9.html
Quote:If you care at all about value, the Ryzen 5 1600 is clearly the way to go. This is why we recently named it the best value performance desktop CPU. It was unlikely that the Core i7-7800X was going to change that, but we hoped the performance would at least be a compelling reason to buy Intel's new six-core processor.
...
Compared to the 7800X, the R5 1600 deliveres a similar experience once overclocked and even at stock it was just 4% slower throughout our benchmarks. It also consumes less power, costs considerably less, and comes with a better cooler out of the box. The Ryzen 5 1600 is the obvious choice for gamers.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#98
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-...49-10.html
Quote:AMD is hitting hard with Ryzen 3. The quad-core models aren't as aggressively segmented as Intel's Core i3 family, so you get unlocked ratio multipliers, a competent Wraith Spire cooler, and a lower cost to entry. And it isn’t like overclocking Ryzen 3 1300X requires much effort; we used a B350-based motherboard and the stock thermal solution for a quick and easy jump to 3.9 GHz.

In comparison, Intel's only overclockable Core i3 is pricey on its own, and that's before you factor in an expensive Z270-based motherboard or third-party heat sink/fan.
...
So, if you're only doing office work and don't plan on buying an add-in GPU, Intel's the way to go.

However, enthusiasts looking for a speedy chip should strongly consider the Ryzen 3 1300X. It's an excellent value that leaves room in your budget for other high-performance devices. It also gives you spare cores for productivity applications. AMD has solidified its AM4 motherboard ecosystem, so the platforms are stable, and we can confidently recommend them. We’ll follow up with in-depth application testing, but initial signs are positive. After all, it isn’t hard to imagine that quad-core models will best Intel's dual-cores offerings in most productivity applications.

Make no mistake, you’ll see the Ryzen 3 1300X on our Best CPUs list soon. We'll circle back with application testing in the Ryzen 3 1200 review. Meanwhile, the Coffee Lake processors can’t come soon enough for Intel.

http://techreport.com/review/32301/amd-r...eviewed/13
Quote:That's good news for AMD, but Ryzen 3 parts will still sell for as much as Core i3s—a fact that I find a bit hard to stomach.

As I noted at the beginning of this review, those prices seem ambitious for one major reason: onboard graphics and Ryzen's lack thereof. Intel's similarly-priced Core i3 chips offer a plug-and-play PC build for those who don't game. That missing graphics processor won't matter for gamers shopping Ryzen 3, of course, but it matters for the much larger market of basic PCs and home-theater machines out there. The unavoidable need for and cost of a discrete graphics card limits the appeal and design envelope for Ryzen 3 chips. All this will change with the eventual arrival of Ryzen APUs and their Radeon Vega onboard graphics, but for now, Intel would seem to maintain its lock on the basic DIY PC.

Considering Ryzen's missing integrated graphics, AMD might have considered even more aggressive pricing. A Ryzen 3 1300X for $99 or $109 and a Ryzen 3 1200 for $79 or $89 would have really given us something to talk about for performance-per-dollar, and it would also leave plenty of wiggle room for buyers to squeeze that discrete graphics card into their budgets. Those price points wouldn't be unprecedented, either: the company's unlocked and graphics-free Athlons of years past occupied similar brackets. Ryzen 3 chips seem like a perfect successor to those products.

In that light, Intel's Kaby Lake Pentiums and Core i3s (except the pricey i3-7350K) still have plenty of appeal in the face of the Ryzen onslaught. Kaby Lake chips still have a single-threaded performance advantage that will make basic desktop tasks feel snappier, and more well-heeled Core i3 buyers can add an Optane Memory cache to big hard drives for SSD-like performance from their large Steam libraries and other applications. That might be an appealing prospect given the industry-wide NAND supply crunch that's occurring right now.

No, you can't overclock any Core i3 (again, except the pricey i3-7350K), but I feel like that restriction isn't that choking given Kaby Lake chips' already-solid performance, high efficiency, and built-in graphics processors for those who need them. Intel also doesn't seem to lock down memory multipliers on its locked CPUs, so it's easy enough to run fast RAM with one of those chips for extra performance. Solid-looking Z270 boards are available for about the same price as AMD B350 boards, and USB 3.1 Gen 2 support is about the only thing missing from those inexpensive Intel mobos.

All that said, if you'd rather build an all-AMD budget gaming box with Ryzen 3, I wouldn't blame you. Socket AM4 motherboards should offer a fine upgrade path to Ryzen 5 or Ryzen 7 CPUs if more computing power is needed down the line, and USB 3.1 Gen 2 support baked in is a nice bonus versus affordable Intel mobos. AMD's Wraith Stealth cooler is both quiet and pleasant-sounding, too, a nice change of pace from Intel's bottom-dollar stock coolers of late.

Of the two Ryzen 3 CPUs launching today, I'd grab a Ryzen 3 1300X for its high stock clocks and wide XFR range, but that's because my patience for overclocking has waned in my old age. Folks willing to spend some time in firmware with the Ryzen 3 1400 may find enough performance left in the tank to make it worth the money saved, and since every dollar matters for gaming machines at this price point, AMD's unlocked multipliers on the Ryzen 3 1400 could help to move quite a few of those chips in budget gaming builds. Either way, you can't go wrong, and that should be music to AMD's ears as the Ryzen buzz continues to build.

https://www.extremetech.com/computing/25...-i3-family
Quote:With Ryzen 3, AMD is targeting (relatively) budget gamers who don’t have a lot of cash to throw around, but who want more performance in multi-threaded applications than Core i3 can provide. True budget buyers who only require a basic system will be best served by the Core i3-7100, which offers an integrated GPU that Ryzen 3 lacks. But Intel’s GPUs, while far better than in the past, still never get the chance to strut their stuff on that platform. Intel reserves its highest performing GPUs for mobile products, which means you can’t really expect great 1080p performance out of a Core i3 without buying a GPU as well. AMD is betting that a true quad-core that frees up $20-40 in spending is more attractive to the budget gamer than the prospect of paying for an iGPU that never gets used at a higher price. Time will tell if they’re right about this.

Beyond that, Ryzen neatly slides into place at the bottom of AMD’s refresh cycle. If you’ve followed the launch of Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7, this won’t be a surprise. AMD’s decision to standardize its CPU configurations make performance fairly easy to predict. And in this case, Ryzen 3’s overall performance establishes it as competitive relative to the Core i3, though exactly how competitive will depend on what tests you care about and whether you want an iGPU. If you’ve got the cash to spend, we’d argue that the 1600X is the best multi-threaded performer in AMD’s lineup, with the best balance between price, single-threaded, and multi-threaded performance. But buyers who choose to save some money and opt for Ryzen 3 can count on a capable, solid CPU.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply
#99
Ryzen Linux bug: http://techreport.com/news/32362/amd-con...m-on-ryzen
Check out this comment:
Quote:This issue has been floating around since RyZen's launch and there's a thread about the latest developments in TR's forums too.

While this issue has been around for about 5 months now, the real key to getting it recognized was that some Gentoo guys put together a GCC test script that automated the process so you can start throwing segfaults pretty quickly. That automation and the additional publicity finally got the attention of AMD.

Edit: And this comment too:
Quote:The Gentoo people noticed it because they are a source only distro. Basically, you compile *everything* that runs on your system from source code. So, their users run the compiler a lot. They are prime candidates for finding a bug like this.

The down side is that people who like to build all of their programs from scratch are considered a little nutty, so they aren't always taken seriously when they report problems. Lots of time it's problems with their hardware (bad PSU, CPU pins bent, bad memory, wrong BIOS settings, etc.) and not a true fault in the processor. You have to go through a lot of steps to rule out pilot error before you can solidly point the finger at the processor having a bug.

The Skylake bug that the Prime95 community found was a lot quicker to escallate because it has a well populated forum of very knowledgable people who have been beating on CPUs for decades and know how to quickly diagnose hardware issues. Heck, Prime95 is commonly used as a burn in tool. Want to see if your PSU is good? Cooling system? Memory config? Run Prime95 for a day.

So, it comes down to experience of the community and credibility.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)