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Ryzen Release Thread
https://www.techpowerup.com/250183/amd-3...putex-2019
Quote:In a development that could explain why Intel is frantically stitching together 10 cores with the "Comet Lake" silicon, a slide leaked from a private event hosted by motherboard major GIGABYTE reveals that AMD's third generation Ryzen desktop platform could launch as early as Computex 2019 (June). The platform will include AMD's first client-segment processor based on its "Zen 2" microarchitecture, codenamed "Matisse," and its companion chipset, the AMD X570.

3rd generation Ryzen with X570 is expected to be the world's first mainstream desktop platform to feature PCI-Express gen 4.0. AMD could maintain the processor's backwards compatibility with older 300-series and 400-series chipset motherboards by shaping its PCI-Express implementation to use external re-drivers based on the motherboard, according to Taiwan-based industry observer Lars Nilsson. This could make 500-series motherboards slightly pricier than current AM4 motherboards. Backwards compatibility could mean unless you really need PCIe gen 4.0, you should be able to save by opting for older motherboards.
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https://www.techpowerup.com/250412/amd-h...en-5-3600x
Quote:The tease in question was posted by an AMD-contracted Sales agency in South Korea, which launched a campaign inviting users to guess Cinebench scores for upcoming AMD processors: namely, the Ryzen 7 3700X and Ryzen 5 3600X - thus confirming the nomenclature for AMD's upcoming CPUs. The contest finishes on December 14th, and is basically asking users to take a gander on scores for unreleased CPUs - promising prizes of said CPUs when they launch.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-ry...38310.html
Quote:Russian price tracking website e-Katalog has listed AMD's complete upcoming Ryzen 3000-series processor lineup. It’s notable that E-Katalog doesn't sell products. Instead, it lists pricing for a range of items, like household and computer equipment, electronics, home, and office products, much like PCPartPicker.

While the specifications fall in line with the recent AdoredTV leak, these listings could be placeholders and should be taken with a grain of salt. However, if there is any truth to the listings, AMD could really shake up the processor market with the new Ryzen chips.
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According to the listings, the Ryzen 3 3300 runs at 3.2GHz with a 4GHz boost clock and 50W TDP (thermal design power), while the Ryzen 3 3300X variant boasts a 3.5GHz base clock and 4.3GHz boost clock with a slightly higher 65W TDP. They are expected to cost no more than $130, which is almost unthinkable for a hexa-core chip.

The Russian website lists the Ryzen 5 3600 at 3.6GHz with a boost clock that reaches 4.4GHz. As for the Ryzen 5 3600X, the chip reportedly has a 4GHz base clock and 4.8GHz boost clock. The non-X variant comes with 65W TDP and the X variant with a 95W TDP.

Going up the Ryzen 3000-series ladder, the Ryzen 7 3700 is listed with a 3.8GHz base clock, 4.6GHz boost clock, and 95W TDP. The higher-end Ryzen 7 3700X flaunts a 4.2GHz base clock, 5GHz boost clock, and 105W TDP.

Lastly, the Ryzen 3800X ticks at 3.9GHz with a 4.7GHz boost clock and is listed with a 125W TDP. On the other hand, the Ryzen 9 3850X is listed with a 4.3GHz base clock and a shockingly-high 5.1GHz boost clock with a 135W TDP rating. However, e-Katalog only listed the first, which could reinforce the rumor that AMD will release the Ryzen 9 3850X at a later date (May 2019).
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-ry...38399.html
Quote:Possibly matching Intel's single-threaded performance is a watershed moment for AMD, as that type of workload has long been one of the few areas where the Ryzen processors lagged behind Intel's models. But that isn't all. Su also pointed out that the denser 7nm node allowed the Ryzen processor to consume less power, which ultimately equates to heat, than the Core i9-9900K.

The AMD processor pulled ~30% less power than the Core i9-9900K. That's a tremendous advantage over Intel's processors, which have gained a reputation for requiring high-end motherboards, power supplies, and coolers to extract the optimum level of performance. The Ryzen processors' impressive achievement means that it could be much cheaper to build full systems with AMD's Ryzen 3000-series processors, thus offering a similar level of performance while maintaining the value advantage.
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Third-gen Ryzen is coming to market in the "middle of 2019," and Su said that the company would share more details as it comes closer to launch.

https://www.techpowerup.com/251379/amd-3...e-chiplets
Quote:On close inspection of the substrate, we find that while the I/O controller die is somewhat centrally to the side of the package, the sole 8-core CPU chiplet is not located at a similar position (think Intel "Clarkdale" MCMs). On zooming in further, we find that just south of the 8-core CPU chiplet die, there appear to be blank bumps protruding over an area similar to that of a chiplet covered up by the outer layers of the substrate, leading us to conclude that the AM4 package is capable of three dies, an I/O controller, and two 8-core CPU chiplets. There very much will be a 16-core/32-thread Ryzen for the AM4 platform, and it's only a question of when.

The 16-core Ryzen AM4 MCM will be similar in concept to the larger 64-core SP3r2 EPYC/Threadripper MCMs: the CPU dies only pack the CPU cores and an InfinityFabric interface, while the I/O controller die is wired to multiple CPU dies, and manages the memory, PCIe, and SoC connectivity of the processor.
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AMD's engineering bravado with "Matisse" also unlocks the possibility of the Ryzen "Raven Ridge" APU successor being an MCM with one 8-core chiplet, and an oversized I/O controller die that packs a "Vega" or "Navi" based iGPU, in addition to memory, PCIe, SoC, and the works. Dies on that package could be arranged differently from this.

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-ry...38401.html
Quote:But after speaking with several motherboard vendors here at CES 2019, we've learned that many of them have successfully tested PCIe 4.0 on 300- and 400-series AMD motherboards, meaning that the feature could be enabled with a simple BIOS update, at least partially.

Our sources tell us that after unlocking the feature via a BIOS update, the older motherboards supply a PCIe 4.0 x16 connection to the first slot on the motherboard, but the remainder of the slots revert to PCIe 3.0 signaling rates. That's because any trace routing on the motherboard that exceeds six inches requires newer redrivers and retimers that support PCIe 4.0's faster signaling rates. That means the PCIe slot nearest to the CPU will easily support PCIe 4.0, while the other slots, including M.2 ports, will run at a PCIe 3.0 signaling rate.

The 500-Series chipsets will consume more power than the 28nm chipsets used on current AM4 motherboards, but that's because the 500-series chipsets also support PCIe 4.0. We weren't told the specific lane allocations of the new chipset, but those faster lanes will be useful for numerous types of secondary I/O devices.

Even though multiple board partners have tested PCIe 4.0 on previous-gen chipsets, it remains to be seen if AMD will allow them to expose that functionality via BIOS updates. Our sources tell us that AMD can simply lock out that feature and that the fate of PCIe 4.0 support on 300- and 400-series motherboards haven't been communicated to them yet.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-ry...38401.html
Quote:Update: We spoke with AMD representatives, who confirmed that 300- and 400-series AM4 motherboards can support PCIe 4.0. AMD will not lock the out feature, instead it will be up to motherboard vendors to validate and qualify the faster standard on its motherboards on a case-by-case basis. Motherboard vendors that do support the feature will enable it through BIOS updates, but those updates will come at the discretion of the vendor.
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https://www.gamersnexus.net/news-pc/3428...ng-asmedia
Quote:Thus far, the information we have obtained regarding Ryzen 3000 points toward a likely June launch month, probably right around Computex, with multiple manufacturers confirming the target. AMD is officially stating “mid-year” launch, allowing some leniency for changes in scheduling, but either way, Ryzen 3000 will launch in about 5 months.

The biggest point of consideration for launch has been whether AMD wants to align its new CPUs with an X570 release, which is presently the bigger hold-up of the two. It seems likely that AMD would want to launch both X570 motherboards and Ryzen 3000 CPUs simultaneously, despite the fact that the new CPUs will work with existing motherboards provided they’ve received a BIOS update.

https://www.gamersnexus.net/news-pc/3429...ram-prices
Quote:A quick update on our previous X570/PCIe story: First off, as pointed out previously, "chipset" wasn't really the right language to use when referring to the X570's induction of "parts" of Epyc -- it's just PCIe 4.0, more or less, that's moving over. We had a few people reach out to us and confirm that the chipset will almost certainly be running PCIe 4.0, responsible for the power requirement increase and for potential logistical challenges.

Separately, on core counts, our engineering contacts within the industry have informed us that we should expect 16C and 12C CPUs with Ryzen 3000, in addition to the usual 8-core parts. It's just a question of if those launch altogether or independently.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/ryzen-...38474.html
Quote:It's encouraging to hear that AMD's next round of Ryzen chips will not need specific new software enhancements to accommodate the design, as that was a key concern when the first-gen chips arrived. AMD has said that it will release the new third-gen Ryzen processors in mid-2019, which lines up nicely with Computex. As with AMD's previous big launches, we expect more information to come to light slowly in the intervening months as the company builds the hype for its newest round of processors.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-ma...38493.html
Quote:There's been plenty of speculation that AMD's new 7nm third-gen Ryzen processors could come equipped with more than the eight cores the company showed off at its recent CES keynote, and prolific database-detective TUM_APISAK's discovery of a 12-core 24-thread AMD engineering sample in the UserBenchmark database will certainly further the theory.
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The test result lists the 12-core 24-thread engineering sample with a 3.4 GHz base clock and a 3.6 GHz average boost during the test. The 2D3212BGMCWH2_37/34_N product identifier lists the peak boost clock as 3.7 GHz, and the TDP rating as 105W. We're expecting higher turbo speeds from the third-gen Ryzen processors, the current gen tops out at 4.3 GHz, but early silicon typically comes with dialed back frequencies as vendors fine-tune the design. In other words, these results likely aren't representative of the final clock speeds.
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The chips' single-core floating point score is also telling - at 130 points it outstrips a current-gen Ryzen 7 2700X (at roughly the same clocks) by ~13%, an improvement likely born of improved instruction per clock (IPC) throughput. That implies this chip comes with the Zen 2 microarchitecture.
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https://www.techpowerup.com/251964/asmed...se-chipset
Quote:It's being reported now that ASMedia will develop some, if not all 500-series chipsets, with the exception of X570. The X570 will be an in-house design by AMD, which will use its own foundry partners (likely GloFo 14 nm) to manufacture it. This presents AMD with an opportunity to harden it against vulnerabilities, and have greater control over pricing, not to mention overcoming key design shortfalls of "Promontory," such as downstream PCIe connectivity.
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Sources also mention that ASMedia-supplied chipsets will only hit the market toward the end of 2019, which means AMD X570 could be the only 500-series chipset option between the mid-2019 launch of 3rd generation Ryzen, and late-2019. You should be able to run these processors on older socket AM4 motherboards via BIOS updates, though.

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-x5...38511.html
Quote:However, there's just one inconsistency with Digitimes' report: the time frame. The article says ASMedia will not complete the tape-out for PCIe 4.0 until the end of the year. However, the penultimate paragraph claims ASMedia will roll out tape-outs for PCIe 4.0 by the end of of the year.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-3d...38838.html
Quote:AMD revealed at a recent high performance computing event that it is working on new designs that use 3D-stacked DRAM and SRAM on top of its processors to improve performance.
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Norrod explained the challenges with frequency scaling: "The dirty little secret in the industry, though, over the last ten years that has stopped, and may now be regressing[...]As we continually shrink our processes now, we don't get any more frequency, and really with this next node, without doing extraordinary things, we get less frequency."
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Norrod didn't dive into more specifics of any designs under development, but this could prove to be a fundamental shift in AMD's processor design. Intel's fast pace of development with its own 3D Foveros technology could prove to be a defining moment for the industry, so it isn't surprising to hear that AMD is moving in this direction to keep pace. For now, details are under wraps, but we've followed up with AMD for more information.
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https://www.techpowerup.com/253893/msi-r...-microcode
Quote:Such a major change in AGESA shouldn't be warranted to add support for two new chips based on existing "Raven Ridge" architecture that both AGESA "Summit Ridge" and AGESA PiR (Pinnacle Ridge) series microcodes should be able to comfortably run. We spoke with sources familiar with AMD microcode, who revealed that this AGESA COMBO-AM4 0.0.7.2 is designed for the upcoming "Zen 2" microarchitecture, and its first socket AM4 implementation, codenamed "Matisse." AMD internal versions of AGESA with Matisse support begin with the version sequence 0.0.7.x., and as we head closer to formal launch of these chips, AMD could release a 1.0.0.0 version of "AGESA COMBO-AM4." For our B450 Gaming Pro Carbon AC, the BIOS version packing this new AGESA is v1.60, and we wager this board should now be able to run Ryzen "Matisse" engineering samples. Now, if we can only get our hands on one.

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/mother...38872.html
Quote:There have been whispers that AMD had sent out engineering samples to multiple motherboard partners for testing. The rumors could be true, considering motherboard manufacturers including Asus, MSI and Biostar have already started releasing BIOS updates, seemingly in anticipation of the Matisse processors. Asus and MSI specifically mention support for upcoming AMD processors, while Biostar didn't provide any specific details.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-ry...38900.html
Quote:While model names might not give us much insight into what Asus is planning, it is important to note that this list includes one of Asus's highest end motherboards, the Formula, which it has only used for Intel-based boards. Asus bringing it to the Ryzen family implies that AMD's next CPUs are now worthy of the brand, perhaps because Asus believes the processors are truly equal to Intel's 9th generation.

ITX fans will be pleased to see the Impact come to Ryzen, another formerly Intel-only part, especially because Asus only has two ITX Ryzen motherboards, one for X370 and the other for B450. Otherwise, this lineup is what many would expect to see based on Asus's 400-series lineup.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/ryzen-...38967.html
Quote:The unidentified Matisse processor from the leak has the “2DS104BBM4GH2_38/34_N” product identifier. According to Marvin's handy AMD Condename Decoder, the leaked Ryzen 3000-series processor is an engineering sample, and therefore still subject to future changes. So take the initial specifications with a small pinch of salt.

As implied by its codename, this Ryzen 3000-series chip is a desktop processor that allegedly features four cores and eight threads. This configuration highly suggests that the processor in question is probably a entry-level Ryzen 3 part. Curiously, the quad-core, eight-thread setup also contradicts the AdoredTV Leak that purportedly claims that even the low-end Ryzen 3 3000-series models will come with six cores.

The quad-core Ryzen 3000-series processor reportedly runs with a 3.4GHz base clock and 3.8GHz boost clock. It also comes equipped with 4MB of L2 cache and 16MB of L3 cache. This model in particular carries a 65W TDP (thermal design power) badge, which concurs with AdoredTV's 65W allegation for Ryzen 3 3000-series chips.
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https://www.techpowerup.com/254259/amd-t...-this-june
Quote:It is revealed that Dr. Su will simultaneously launch or unveil at least four product lines. High up the agenda is AMD's highly anticipated 3rd generation Ryzen desktop processors in the socket AM4 package, based on "Zen 2" microarchitecture, and a multi-chip module (MCM) codenamed "Matisse."
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https://techreport.com/news/34544/rumor-...t-computex
Quote:Our buddies over at TechPowerUp took things a step further this morning, bombastically stating that AMD will launch or unveil a new generation of both Ryzen and Radeon processors at the show, with products coming in June. The site doesn't list its sources, but such a statement seems at least plausible given what we've heard in the past. TechPowerUp goes on to specifically state that the site expects AMD to launch or unveil "at least four" new product lines, and suggests EPYC and Instinct as the third and fourth possible reveals—a claim that sounds more dubious to us.
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Improved support for Zen 2, which apparently refers to the next Ryzen CPUs, added to HWiNFO: https://www.tomshardware.com/news/hwinfo...38996.html
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https://www.extremetech.com/computing/28...provements
Quote:First, AMD doesn’t have financial room to pull this kind of trick, even if it wanted to.

As of Q4 2018, AMD’s gross margin was 37.84 percent. This represents a significant long-term improvement over the pre-Ryzen era. The company’s actual operating and net profit margins, however, are much lower — in the 5-6 percent range. This useful tool from MacroTrends.net lets you compare all three values; a screenshot of AMD’s most recent results and historical data is shown below:
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Investors have made it clear on conference calls that they want AMD’s margins to come up. AMD itself has identified critical markets that it wants to compete in, including servers, laptops, and the burgeoning AI/deep learning market, which is expected to define and drive computing in the next decade. While its server market share is rising, AMD’s share of the entire AI/DL space seems to be basically nil. The company has done some work with Google and there have been rumors that it built Radeon Instinct as a semi-custom solution for a customer, but, as this extensive machine learning overview from AI expert Tim Dettmers demonstrates, AMD isn’t viewed as a strong competitor by professionals working in this field, at least not right now. He writes: “AMD invests little into their deep learning software and as such one cannot expect that the software gap between Nvidia and AMD will close.”
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Second, AMD has never historically gutted its own product families pricing in the manner these various 7nm rumors anticipate. Prior to the introduction of the Ryzen 7 family, which debuted as high as $500, AMD seized leadership of various markets on two occasions: The introduction of the Athlon 64, and the launch of the Athlon 64 X2. The first re-established AMD’s 64-bit chip as a superior solution in many consumer applications after the Athlon XP had lost that crown. The second gave AMD a serious claim to overall superiority, even in rendering and multi-threaded apps where it had previously lagged the P4 thanks to the latter’s support for Hyper-Threading.
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https://www.techpowerup.com/254634/msi-b...300-series
Quote:This normally should mean that any 300-series motherboard must support 4th generation Ryzen processors with a simple BIOS update. Most 300-series motherboards, including from MSI, even ship with USB BIOS Flashback feature to help with forwards compatibility. Unfortunately, motherboard companies such as MSI care more about their bottom-lines than the consumer. In a support e-mail to an X370 XPower Titanium owner, MSI confirmed that it will not extend Zen 2 support to AMD 300-series. Other motherboard vendors could follow MSI's suit as a representative of another motherboard vendor, on condition of anonymity, told TechPowerUp that "Zen 2" processors have steeper electrical requirements that 300-series motherboards don't meet. This is an excuse similar to the one Intel gave for the planned obsolescence of its 100-series and 200-series chipsets, even as it was repeatedly proven that those motherboards can run and overclock 9th generation processors with custom firmware just fine. Would MSI care to explain whether a B450M PRO-M2 has a stronger VRM than an X370 XPower Titanium to warrant "Zen 2" support? Will all "Zen 2" processor SKUs have steep electrical requirements? Will there not be any SKUs with double-digit-Watt TDP ratings?
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https://www.techpowerup.com/254656/amd-z...y-increase
Quote:AMD "Zen 3" microarchitecture could be designed for the enhanced 7 nm+ EUV (extreme ultraviolet) silicon fabrication node at TSMC, which promises a significant 20 percent increase in transistor densities compared to the 7 nm DUV (deep ultraviolet) node on which its "Zen 2" processors are being built. In addition, the node will also reduce power consumption by up to 10 percent at the same operational load.
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https://www.techpowerup.com/254669/msi-i...therboards
Quote:It has come to our attention that MSI Customer Support has regrettably misinformed an MSI customer with regards to potential support for next-gen AMD CPUs on the MSI X370 XPOWER GAMING TITANIUM motherboard. Through this statement we want clarify the current situation.

At this point, we are still performing extensive testing on our existing lineup of 300- and 400-series AM4 motherboards to verify potential compatibility for the next-gen AMD Ryzen CPUs. To be clear: Our intention is to offer maximum compatibility for as many MSI products as possible. Towards the launch of the next-gen AMD CPUs, we will release a compatibility list of MSI AM4 motherboards. Below is a full list of upcoming BIOS versions which include compatibility for the next-gen AMD APUs for our 300-Series and 400-Series AM4 motherboards based on the latest AMD Combo PI version 1.0.0.0. These BIOS versions are expected to be released in May this year.
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https://www.techpowerup.com/254804/amd-r...-de-lidded
Quote:AMD Ryzen 3 3200G is an upcoming processor featuring integrated graphics, forming the tail-end of the company's 3rd generation Ryzen desktop processor family. A Chinese PC enthusiast with access to an early sample pictured and de-lidded the processor. We know from older posts that while the "Matisse" MCM will form the bulk of AMD's 3rd gen Ryzen lineup, with core counts ranging all the way from 6 to 12, and possibly 16 later, the APU lineup is rumored to be based on older "Zen+" architecture.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-ry...39154.html
Quote:The Chinese user was greeted with an unpleasant surprise after delidding his first Ryzen 3 3200G sample. Apparently, AMD has decided to solder the IHS onto the company's upcoming Ryzen 3000-series desktop parts. AMD had previously glued the IHS to the Ryzen 2000-series chips with thermal paste, which was likely a move by the US chipmaker to reduce costs. Unaware of AMD's switcharoo, the forum poster had accidentally ripped off half of the processor die in his first attempt to delid the Ryzen 3 3200G. Luckily, he has like eight of these bad boys on hand.

After closely examining the Ryzen 3 3200G and Ryzen 3 2200G, 独月 discovered that the size of the dies between both chips is almost identical. As a matter of fact, even the capacitor is located in the same position. He also confirmed that the Ryzen 3000-series processors share the same core and cache configuration as their predecessors.

独月 confessed that although he's not a very experienced overclocker, the Ryzen 3000-series seemingly overclocks better than the current Ryzen 2000-series. Our guess is that this is probably the work of AMD's Zen+ microarchitecture and 12nm optimizations. Given the small sample size though, it might be too early to draw any concrete conclusions.
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The Ryzen 3 2200G at 4,000MHz and Ryzen 3 3200G at 4,300MHz both hit the 75 degrees Celsius mark at full load. On the other hand, the Ryzen 5 3400G at 4,250MHz only runs one degree Celsius hotter than a Ryzen 5 2400G at 3925MHz. Overall, the results are pretty impressive.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/biosta...39175.html
Quote:Biostar's announcement is the official acknowledgment that AMD's X570 motherboards will see the light of day at Computex 2019, which will be held between May 28 and June 1. Biostar was careful not to mention the term X570 or the Ryzen 3000-series in the press release. The motherboard manufacturer's current third-generation Racing AMD motherboards are based on the X470 chipset. Using logical reasoning based on the established naming convention, the fourth-generation of Biostar's motherboards should carry the X570 badge, unless AMD decides to magically release a different chipset between now and then, which is highly unlikely.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-ry...39304.html
Quote:TUM_APISAK, a very well respected leaker in the hardware scene, has tweeted the alleged specifications for AMD's upcoming Ryzen 3000-series 16-core processor, which is based on the Zen 2 processor microarchitecture and 7nm process node. The chip purportedly sports a 3.3 GHz base clock and 4.2 GHz boost clock.

AMD has only officially disclosed an eight-core Ryzen 3000 model, so the big takeaway today is purported confirmation that AMD will indeed offer a 16-core 32-thread chip, as hinted by AMD President and CEO Dr. Lisa Su and listed in the infamous AdoredTV leak.

https://www.techpowerup.com/255386/amd-r...-am4-beast
Quote:The infamous Adored TV leaks that drew the skeleton of AMD's 3rd generation Ryzen roadmap, referenced two desktop Ryzen 9 parts, the Ryzen 9 3800X and Ryzen 9 3850X. The 3800X is supposed to be clocked at 3.90 GHz with 4.70 GHz boost, with a TDP rating of 125W, while the 3850X tops the charts at 4.30 GHz base and a staggering 5.10 GHz boost. The rated TDP has shot up to 135W. We can now imagine why some motherboard vendors are selective with BIOS updates on some of their lower-end boards. AMD is probably maximizing the clock-speed headroom of these chips out of the box, to preempt Intel's "Cannon Lake" 10-core/20-thread processor.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/msi-me...39308.html
Quote:While the Computex conference, where we expect a formal announcement for AMD’s Zen 2-based Ryzen 3000 series CPUs, is still a few weeks away, today we got our first teaser of an X570-based motherboard, the MEG ACE from MSI. Though few details were shared, the MSI Gaming Twitter account posted a cryptic video of the board with an easter egg or two hinting at what the new generation board is all about.
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Pricing was not mentioned on the unreleased MSI X570 boards, but we do know from previous generations the MEG Ace and Godlike motherboards sit towards the high-end of the product stack. We expect to see the MEG X570 Ace in all its glory as well as other X570 boards unveiled in the coming days and while we're at Computex. Get ready, it looks like Ryzen 3000 is almost here.
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https://www.techpowerup.com/255405/amd-r...0-possible
Quote:Our resident Ryzen memory guru Yuri "1usmus" Bubliy, author of DRAM Calculator for Ryzen, found technical info that confirms just how much progress AMD has been making.

The third generation Ryzen processors will be able to match their Intel counterparts when it comes to memory overclocking. In the Zen 2 BIOS, the memory frequency options go all the way up to "DDR4-5000", which is a huge increase over the first Ryzens. The DRAM clock is still linked to the Infinity Fabric (IF) clock domain, which means at DDR4-5000, Infinity Fabric would tick at 5000 MHz DDR, too. Since that rate is out of reach for IF, AMD has decided to add a new 1/2 divider mode for their on-chip bus. When enabled, it will run Infinity Fabric at half the DRAM actual clock (eg: 1250 MHz for DDR4-5000).
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1usmus also discovered that the platform adds a SoC OC mode and VDDG voltage control. We've heard from several sources that AMD invested heavily in improving memory compatibility, especially in the wake of Samsung discontinuing its B-die DRAM chips.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/ryzen-...39319.html
Quote:Recently, AMD released a new AGESA update for its motherboard partners' BIOSes, which have been pushed out over the past few days. These new BIOS revisions reveal that AMD has moved on to the second stepping (B0) of its Ryzen 3000 series processors, meaning the company has revised the design and appears to be on track for a release in the coming months.
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ASUS did not update all of its motherboards with this new BIOS, but it did update some boards with the A320, B350, X370, and B450 chipsets, which is a good sign for compatibility, since AMD technically never guaranteed chipset compatibility with future CPUs, just socket compatibility.
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With summer quickly approaching, it seems unlikely AMD will have the time to possibly make a C0 revision before launch, meaning Ryzen 3000 could be arriving sooner rather than later, and with such a small amount of updates, it's possible that development for Matisse has gone smoothly for AMD.
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Biostar releases X570 chipset specs: https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-x5...39324.html
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AMD confirms next generation of Ryzen launching in Q3, will be 7nm: https://www.techpowerup.com/255554/amd-c...avi-for-q3
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https://www.techpowerup.com/255600/amd-r...s-revealed
Quote:AMD is giving finishing touches to its Ryzen 3000 "Picasso" family of APUs, and Thai PC enthusiast TUM_APISAK has details on their CPU clock speeds. The Ryzen 3 3200G comes with 3.60 GHz nominal clock-speed and 4.00 GHz maximum Precision Boost frequency; while the Ryzen 5(?) 3400G ships with 3.70 GHz clock speeds along with 4.20 GHz max Precision Boost. The "Picasso" silicon is an optical shrink of the 14 nm "Raven Ridge" silicon to the 12 nm FinFET process at GlobalFoundries, the same one on which AMD builds "Pinnacle Ridge" and "Polaris 30."
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/ryzen-...39366.html
Quote:The leaked Ryzen 5 3400G from the SiSoftware was accompanied by the B550A4-EM from German manufacturer Medion. Up to now, there was only talk of the X570 chipset. It's not rare for chipmakers to promote their high-end chipsets first as budget offerings lack the 'wow' factor. However, the budget chipsets are often what drive sales so chipmakers can't neglect that segment of the market either.

Judging by the naming convention, the B550 chipset will probably replace the current B450 chipset. Ryzen 3000-series parts should work fine on the majority of existing AMD AM4 motherboards with the help of a BIOS update. It does arouse our curiosity to see how the B550 chipset will fit into the AMD family. As evidenced by Asus' recent deployment of BIOS updates, some of the budget-friendly weren't on the guest list. Perhaps AMD will start there to push the B550 chipset.
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https://www.techpowerup.com/255613/amd-t...-in-august
Quote:AMD will be delivering two keynotes: the first, on August 19th, is simply titled "Zen 2", and will therefore deal with the underpinnings of the Zen 2 microarchitecture, which will be pervasive to all of AMD's CPU product lines.
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So, with AMD diving deep into both architectures come August... it's extremely likely the company will have launched both product lines by then.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/gigaby...39377.html
Quote:EDIT 5/19/19 7:30am PT: We confirmed that a PCIe 4.0 option is available on X470, but reports have surfaced that the option is also available for the budget-oriented B450 motherboards.

Original Story:

Over the last few weeks, motherboard makers have released a steady stream of BIOS updates to support AMD's Ryzen 3000 processors, but Gigabyte's newest BIOS has a special feature: The company has enabled the option for PCIe 4.0 in the BIOS of its X470 Aorus Gaming Wi-Fi 7 motherboard. That signals that, under some circumstances, the company will likely support PCIe 4.0 on existing motherboards if you drop in a new Ryzen 3000 processor.

An alert redditor noticed the new setting in Gigabyte's F40 BIOS, and our motherboard team verified that this option now appears in the Gigabyte BIOS under the PCIe Slot Configuration submenu.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-x5...39370.html
Quote:Update 5/20/19, 9:20am PT: The box for ASRock's Taichi X570 motherboard has also leaked, showing little in the ways of aesthetics or specifications. The box reuses the same "Ryzen 3000 ready" logo we saw on BIOSTAR's boards and is the typical size we'd expect for a high-end motherboard. Given the appearance of retail packaging, it's highly likely the launch for Ryzen 3000 is imminent–perhaps even within the month.
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