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Coffee Lake Thread
Coffee Lake refresh expanded with i5-9400 and KF CPUs: https://www.techpowerup.com/251301/intel...re-i5-9400
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The part about KF CPUs was premature (my fault), but it's real now: https://www.techpowerup.com/251317/intel...-lack-igpu
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Also released is the i5-9400F: https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...38398.html
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...38434.html
Quote:We previously weren't aware of the pricing on these new models, but Intel's new official price list reveals that the company has set their RCP (Recommended Customer Pricing) the same as their iGPU-equipped counterparts.
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We've confirmed that Intel's new processors have the same die as the "normal" versions, so the disabled graphics units are still physically present. We also learned the disabled graphics unit doesn't impart any performance advantages, such as longer boost duration or higher overclocking capability. Simply put, you can expect the same amount of compute performance from these chips as their normal iGPU-equipped equivalents, meaning the only advantage would be that you might actually be able to buy the processors if the normal chips are out of stock.
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Intel's production shortfall, which comes largely as a byproduct of record demand, has caused periodic shortages and ongoing price hikes. But it remains to be seen if the new F-series processors will land at a lower price at retail outlets. Retailers weigh a complex set of factors, with availability being a key consideration, when setting the final retail price. That means the F-Series processors could theoretically retail at lower prices if their equivalents are harder to source, but by setting the recommended pricing at the same level as the full-featured models, Intel has (perhaps inadvertently) given retailers license to mark the lesser models up to the same pricing we see with the processors impacted by the shortage.

We've found that pricing and availability for many of Intel's flagship 9th-generation processors have stabilized recently, although they largely still aren't available at the recommended price points. Provided the F-series processors land on shelves in enough volume to help offset the shortage, they could help alleviate pricing pressure on Intel's standard models. That's obviously Intel's intention here, but in either case, if all things are equivalent availability-wise, Intel has set the pricing for the defeatured processors at the same level as their better-equipped counterparts.

That means the F-series processors likely won't save you any money, but they could be the only option at checkout.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...38482.html
Quote:Intel doesn’t plan to let its continued 14nm shortage or inability to ship 10nm processors stop it from planning the factories where it will make the 7nm chips expected to debut in a few years. The Oregonian reported that the company plans to expand its Oregon factory, D1X, to prep for the 7nm shift.

The report cited anonymous sources in Oregon’s construction industry as saying that “Intel has spoken openly about its D1X plans and expect the project to last at least 18 months, followed by several months of equipment installation,” and that “sources inside Intel’s manufacturing operation also have been told to prepare for a major Oregon project this year.”
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https://www.techpowerup.com/251950/intel...rp-pricing
Quote:The i9-9900KF has been found online for $582.50, more than $50 above the i9-9900K's $530 street pricing, while the 9600KF is listed at $308.75, more than $60 over the street pricing of Intel's i7-9600K. Remember that these prices are gouged on account of limited availability on the market; when these are more widespread and the market sees stocks in line with demand expectations, these should bottom down. But then again, we've seen Intel's products being price-increased for a while as the company struggled to keep its production up to the demand, amidst a constrained and supposedly already second-line 14 nm process.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/gigaby...38543.html
Quote:Gigabyte might pass out some pink slips in the coming months. According to a report from DigiTimes today, the company is planning to lay off some of its workforce, mostly from its motherboard business, as the segment’s dwindling sales numbers are expected to continue declining into 2019.
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Gigabyte isn’t the only company struggling to sell its motherboards. This is an industry-wide problem that some, like MSI CEO Charles Chiang told us, have blamed on the shortage of Intel’s desktop processors. If people can’t buy new CPUs, they probably aren’t going to buy new motherboards.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...38547.html
Quote:Much to the delight of enthusiasts, Intel's ninth-gen processors marked the return of solder interface material (sTIM), but prolific chip-detective momomo_US uncovered photos of a delidded Core i5-9400F processor without sTIM.
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Whether or not Intel will stick with solder for the other F-series processors, such as the unlocked Core i9-9900KF, remains an open question. It also remains to be seen if Intel will bring the P0 stepping to market (all known retail models carry the U0 stepping), or differentiate between the two different steppings on retail boxes. Currently, that doesn't appear to be the case. We've pinged Intel for more details and will update as necessary.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...38547.html
Quote:Update 2/6/2019: Intel confirmed to us that some Core i5-9400F processors do come with pTIM (polymer TIM - a.k.a. thermal grease), but that can vary based on the location of manufacturing.
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https://www.techpowerup.com/253335/defin...sors-outed
Quote:Japanese PC maker Fujitsu put out a definitive list of all 9th generation Core/Pentium/Celeron desktop processors as part of its updated desktop motherboard BIOS update document, expanding on the models Intel currently has out.
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Here's where it gets interesting. Apparently, the iGPU-devoid "F" extension is being applied to nearly all 9th gen Core SKUs, and not just the ones already launch. So, you can expect an i5-9500F, i5-9600F (besides the already launched i5-9600KF), i3-9100F, and i3-9350KF. Apparently Intel is harvesting dies with defective iGPUs to target DIY PC gamers who are bound to use discrete graphics cards. The 2-core/4-thread Pentium G5600 is also getting "F-ed," with the G5600F.

The other interesting new extension is "T," which has been around in Intel's product stacks for close to a decade. It denotes lower TDP coming from aggressive on-chip power-management and lower clock speeds. There will be "T" variants of most SKUs, including the i9-9900T, i7-9700T, i5-9500T, i5-9400T, i3-9100T, Pentium G5600T, G5420T, and Celeron G4930T. The TDP of all T variants is a flat 35 Watts, regardless of model.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...38782.html
Quote:Intel continues to be plagued by its 14nm chip production shortage, a byproduct of record demand and a delayed 10nm manufacturing process, and today, industry soothsayer DigiTimes reports that the shortage will worsen in the second quarter of 2019.

According to DigiTimes, the peak season for Chromebook sales is approaching, which will have the knock-on effect of worsening the shortage of Intel's low-end 14nm processors. The Core i5, Pentium and Athlon chips currently comprise the brunt of the shortage as Intel focuses on producing higher-margin Core i7, i9 and Xeon products to maximize profits. DigiTimes predicts the shortages will impact the Core i3 series more prominently as the Chromebook season kicks into high gear.
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The publication also noted shortages of the Amber Lake processors that power Apple's MacBook Air. It also claimed that Lenovo measured its chip shortfall in the hundreds of thousands. Third-party notebook manufacturers have also reportedly been impacted heavily by the shortages.

Intel has announced several large investments to bolster its production capacity, with multi-billion-dollar fab expansions planned for its D1X fab in Oregon, along with expansions to its Israel and Ireland fabs. While Intel hasn't provided specific details about the expansions, including which process nodes the fabs will produce or a timeline for the new production lines to begin producing silicon, DigiTimes predicts the increased capacity will come online in the second half of 2019, boosting Intel's overall capacity by 25 percent and ending its production woes.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/int...004-7.html
Quote:Intel's F-series processors represent a new tactic for the company as it struggles with an ongoing shortage of 14nm production capacity. These new models lack integrated graphics. And while we're told they are in high demand at silicon-starved OEMs, they'll soon be available at retail, too, though Intel hasn't given a firm date. Unfortunately, the only benefit these defeatured processors offer over the fully-fledged models appears to be availability. Yet, F-series processors are listed for preorder at a premium price. At least for now. Clearly, the lack of value is a big problem for Intel.
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In the end, the Core i9-9900KF serves up the same impressive performance as Core i9-9900K across our benchmark suite, and may facilitate slightly better overclocking potential. Splave binned a relatively large sample set of 200 Core i9-9900Ks and a smaller pool of five Core i9-9900KFs, finding that a larger percentage of KF models achieved higher frequencies. That anecdotal evidence suggests that Core i9-9900KF could be attractive to overclockers looking for more headroom as they chase records. But it's hard to draw a definitive conclusion from such a small pool of -9900KFs.
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The Core i9 series has no direct rival on a mainstream platform, at least until AMD's Ryzen 3000 series comes to market. But its high price point dampens our enthusiasm. We don't think the KF series represents a good value, particularly at the currently inflated pricing. However, many enthusiasts will opt for the defeatured processors simply because the standard -9900K isn't available. Like the Core i9-9900K, the KF model does provide the best mixture of single- and multi-threaded performance on the market. Unless it shows up at a lower price point than the complete Core i9-9900K, though, there's no real reason to recommend it.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...38846.html
Quote:Belonging to the Coffee Lake family, the i9-9900F is manufactured under Intel's 14nm++ process node. It has an eight-core, 16-thread design and 16MB of L3 cache. According to the SiSoftware entry, the i9-9900F features a 3.1 GHz base clock speed, which is about 500MHz lower than the "K" and "KF" variants. However, the chip seems able to reach 5 GHz on two cores and 4.8 GHz on four cores.

There are a few theories that could explain the processor's behavior. The leaked Core i9-9900F is probably an engineering sample, and Intel is still tweaking the clock speeds. It's also possible the motherboard wasn't recognizing the Core i9-9900F properly without a BIOS update and, thus, not managing the clock speeds correctly. Or, perhaps, Intel just went ahead and reduced the TDP (thermal design power) on the processor, which dramatically limits the clock speeds. Either way, we won't know for sure until more information on the processor arrives.

The Core i9-9900F will probably have a similar price tag to the full-featured Intel Core i9-9900K, which is $499 (~£369.18). As the i9-9900KF has shown us before, a chip with less features doesn't necessarily mean it should be cheaper -- at least not in Intel's books.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/int...,6038.html
Quote:Analyzing all of this info leads to a few theories. Could the 9900KF's have a refined, higher-quality silicon? Intel did similarly with its Engineering Sample 9900Ks versus retail chips. Retail 9900K CPUs are clocking much better on average than their ES counterparts. I have purchased three retail 9900K CPUs, and unless I'm the luckiest man in the world (I actually am but for other reasons), they were all 6.8 GHz+ chips on LN2. I've tried plenty of ES CPUs that maxed at 6.6 - 6.7 GHz. (see above)

Theory two: The 9900KF iGPU has no power pins from socket, which might have some effect beyond the benefit of just disabling the iGPU on a 9900K. Crazier things have happened!

Could we see a refresh of the 9900K series with an updated stepping, higher quality silicon, and better oc’ing like the 9900KF? Perhaps…...

Folks, these are theories. I don’t work for Intel. I’m not a shareholder and I don’t have a dog in this fight beyond clawing for every ounce of performance and clocks I can get. If you already own a nice 9900K, should you go out and buy a 9900KF? Probably not unless you are into overclocking and are displeased with your K-model. If you are in the market to upgrade and are into overclocking, then I would definitely suggest trying the 9900KF if you can find one for sale.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...38919.html
Quote:According to a statement from Asus, Intel will be launching refined variants of its 9th Gen Core processors for the 300 series platform very soon. The company stated that “Asus has released BIOS updates for all 300 series motherboards, adding support for the forthcoming 9th Generation Intel Core processors based on new stepping”. You can read the full release here.

Apparently these chips should be launching some time around Q2 2019, with BIOS updates already available across the majority of Asus’s Z390, H370, B360 and H310 motherboard platforms. These new stepping chips could provide anything between bug fixes, of improvements to the overall architecture, however it's typically something Intel keeps hidden from public view.
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There's still no word from Intel as to whether this is accurate or not, nor whether we'll be seeing any 10th generation processors on a new 10nm node. It's likely Intel would introduce both a new chipset and a new socket at this point to cater towards the increased power draw and core count of any potential drop in transistor size.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/gartne...39046.html
Quote:Gartner and IDC both agreed that Intel's CPU shortage affected the low end of the market and forced manufacturers to look elsewhere. There's a reason why AMD has finally established a foothold in the Chromebook market, for example, and why companies focused more on business-ready products than their consumer counterparts. There simply aren't enough Intel processors to support the low end of the PC market right now.
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These findings support what we've already suspected: that Intel is far from the only company affected by its processor shortage and that manufacturers are turning to AMD for their CPUs rather than simply waiting for Intel to ramp up production. Finding evidence of those claims from one research firm would be validating; finding it from two firms that don't agree on pretty much anything is even more so.
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Remaining Coffee Lake refresh CPUs released: https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...39138.html
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/micros...39172.html
Quote:Microsoft said in January that Intel's ongoing CPU shortage was affecting Windows sales. The company's tune changed on Wednesday: It reportedly said on a call about its third-quarter earnings report that it's no longer concerned about the processor shortage affecting its primary markets.

But it's important to note that Microsoft's lack of concern doesn't mean the CPU shortage has ended; it's merely been alleviated in the segments the company cares about. "We feel good about the supply in the Commercial segment and the Premium Consumer segment, which is where the vast majority of our revenue is in OEM," Microsoft CFO Amy Hood reportedly said on the call. "And so, I think in those segments, we feel fine for Q4."
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Is this good news for Microsoft? Sure. But it probably doesn't mean a lot for the market writ large. The company isn't dependent on Intel; other processors can run Windows just fine. Until more companies decide to use CPUs from AMD in their products--which is harder to do when they have to design their entire device around the processor--the lower end of the market will probably still be waiting on Intel to increase production.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...39190.html
Quote:Intel said in a conference call that despite its $1.5 billion investment last year to boost production capacity for its 14nm process node, the CPU shortages would not be solved until the third quarter of the year.

The company also said it would not begin volume production of 10nm chips until the holiday season of this year. Even so, a recent leaked Intel roadmap showed that most of Intel’s future CPU SKUs would be built on the 14nm process until at least the end of 2020.
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A day earlier, Microsoft said Intel’s CPU shortages aren’t a big deal anymore, after stating in January that the shortages were affecting Windows sales. However, Microsoft may not be as affected in part because Intel prioritized the production of Xeon and Core i7/i9 processors that would normally be destined for systems that Microsoft’s enterprise customers would use. Additionally, some OEMs have started switching to AMD processors, which is certainly one way to end the “CPU shortages.”
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...39290.html
Quote:DigiTimes was clear in the report that Intel's processor shortage won't end in June--it simply won't be as severe as before. The company made similar claims in an April 26 conference call, during which it said the shortage wouldn't be resolved until at least the third quarter, with modest improvements starting in the second half of the year. The drought isn't over, but at least some rain clouds are starting to form.
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What happens when those companies and consumers are no longer desperate? Anonymous industry sources reportedly told DigiTimes that AMD will lose some of its new friends. To quote the report: "With Intel expected to increase supply of processors for budget notebooks in June, brand vendors such as Dell, HP, and Lenovo are expected to step up placing orders with Intel rather than AMD, the sources said."

That all depends on how much Intel ups its production, though, and it would be strange if at least some manufacturers didn't continue to make products with AMD processors. If the shortage has any lesson to offer, it should be that relying on a single company for critical parts is probably ill-advised. Why settle for a single friend who might not always be around when someone else is actively looking for new buddies?

https://www.extremetech.com/computing/29...se-in-june
Quote:All of these predictions could founder depending on what happens next in the US-China trade dispute, however. The battle between the US and China is apparently heating up. Reports suggest that China substantially modified its negotiating position last Friday, ahead of an upcoming visit by Vice Premier Liu He on Thursday. China reportedly modified or withdrew from previously agreed-upon principles or talking points that were guiding the negotiations. President Trump has, in turn, threatened to impose additional tariffs, with tariffs on $200B worth of Chinese goods expected to increase from 10 percent to 25 percent this week, and an additional $325B worth of Chinese goods if the Chinese do not change their negotiating strategy. The Chinese, for their part, have stated:
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It is unclear how these events will impact the tech market because it isn’t clear which products would be selected for tariffs. Up until now, tariffs have been applied selectively, with certain products like mobile devices exempted, and certain other classes of products (like video cards) non-exempt. A true blanket tariff on all products imported from China would impact the US market very differently than a tariff that targets specific finished goods.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/int...107-8.html
Quote:Aside from the -9400F’s lack of integrated graphics (which the Ryzen 5 2600X doesn’t have either), Intel's newest Core i5 still offers leading gaming performance in its price range. A $20 savings is a nice addition that helps Intel stay competitive with AMD. In spite of the -9400F’s discount, though, the Ryzen 5 2600X still gives you the best blend of pricing and performance for general productivity applications. It's quite adept at gaming workloads too, making it an excellent all-rounder. Plus, AMD’s new chips are on the horizon.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...39442.html
Quote:In a bit of pre-keynote excitement, Intel dropped the barest of details about its new Special Edition Core i9-9900KS processor during its Computex Kickoff Event. Intel's new Core i9-9900KS is an eight-core 16-thread model that boosts to 5.0 GHz on all cores - a leap of 300 MHz over the standard Core i9-9900K. It also features a 400MHz higher base frequency of 4.0 GHz.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...39497.html
Quote:Intel announced at its annual Computex keynote its soon-to-be-released Intel Performance Maximizer (IPM) overclocking software, which automatically overclocks your Intel 9th-generation unlocked processor.
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The Intel Performance Maximizer software is still in diapers so it can only do its magic on the current 9th-generation "K" chips. In Intel 's word, the tool examines the DNA of the processor to autotune it. It basically analyzes the processor's cores to find out the maximum speed that they are able to operate at without falling into instability. In Intel's demonstration, the Core i7-9700K processor was overclocked to 5.2 GHz on all eight cores in a matter of minutes. However, Intel is likely using a cherry-picked chip so your actual mileage may vary.

One of the planned features consists of evaluating each core individually to find out the maximum speed for that core. Essentially, you'll have each core in a multi-core processor, such as the Intel Core X-series running at its fastest speed possible. The new feature should be implemented into the Intel Performance Maximizer utility towards the end of the year.
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The Intel Performance Maximizer utility will be available to download for free next month at Intel's website.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...39699.html
Quote:DigiTimes reported today, citing sources at motherboard makers, that Intel plans to cut the pricing of its eighth- and ninth-gen processors by 10-15% and has already notified its partners of the change. If true, that could mean that pricing for some Intel processors could drop anywhere from $25 to a whopping $75 for pricier SKUs.

The revelation seems quite fantastical, and while there are signals that Intel is ramping up for a more competitive environment as AMD launches its 7nm Ryzen 3000 series processors and EPYC Rome processors, there's also the possibility the report is inaccurate or overstated. We also aren't sure if these purported price drops will filter down to retail sales, or if they are targeted at OEMs. Those companies always pay lower pricing than retail, so the impact of the potential price cut may not be as pronounced for the final products.

Historically, Intel has been known to charge premium pricing for its chips, which generally offer faster performance than competing parts, and a quick glance at Intel's pricing guides indicates that Intel has not lowered pricing for a single part, bar none, as it has grappled with the resurgent AMD's Ryzen lineup. Instead, Intel has released new product generations that come to market at lower price points.
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These signs could point to Intel gearing up for a price war, but that doesn't mean it is a certainty. Given Intel's history, it would be shocking if it reduced pricing on its existing parts, but the launch of the Ryzen 3000 chips also marks the first time in AMD's history that it has a process lead over Intel, and AMD's Zen 2-fueled chips are narrowing the node, frequency, and IPC gap with Intel's competing products.

That means this unprecedented event may require an unprecedented response.

We've pinged Intel for comment and will update as necessary.
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https://www.extremetech.com/computing/29...000-launch
Quote:According to DigiTimes (subscription required), Intel could cut CPU prices by up to 15 percent in response to AMD’s upcoming Ryzen parts, and it’s already notified motherboard manufacturers of this change. It’s possible that Intel will take this step, but judging by the company’s actions since before AMD introduced Ryzen in 2017, it’s pretty unlikely.
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What Intel hasn’t done in all this time, however, is actually cut its CPU prices as such. Instead, the company has simply waited until it was time to introduce a new generation of parts and positioned the new CPUs more advantageously than the old. This has allowed Chipzilla to adjust its pricing to account for AMD’s competitiveness without incurring headlines like “Intel Could Cut CPU Prices Ahead of AMD’s Ryzen 3000 Launch.”
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Based on Intel’s actions to-date and its competitive response to Ryzen, we suspect the company will cut prices only as much as it has to. It may or may not be willing to do so before the Ryzen 3000 family launches, and it could choose to focus price cuts on specific SKUs where it needs to improve its competitive standing rather than making across-the-board slashes. At the same time, it isn’t clear how much room Intel has to maneuver without finally making some price cuts on at least some parts. We’ll have to see how Ryzen 7nm parts stand competitively before saying more.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...39871.html
Quote:Intel announced the F-series line in January as a way to mitigate the effects of its processor shortage. The CPUs were nearly identical to their predecessors: they were based on the same Coffee Lake microarchitecture; built using the same 14nm process; and boasted the same core counts, TDPs, and frequencies. Even the prices were the same. The only difference was that Intel disabled the integrated GPUs on its F-series models.

Like we said at the start, that seemed like a hard sell, but it was actually pretty clever on Intel's part. The company was able to increase supplies during its CPU shortage without having to compromise on price, introduce completely new products, or rush processors built using the 10nm process to market. At least people who didn't need integrated graphics (which includes many enthusiasts) could upgrade their systems despite Intel's supply chain woes.

That gambit paid off. CRN reported on Friday that, according to "a top Intel channel executive," the F-series line "now accounts for more than 10 percent of total desktop CPUs sold to system builders through the company's U.S. authorized distributors." Much of the line's success likely stemmed from its expansion to Pentium processors and its availability during the CPU shortage. But it was also said to have resulted from incentives from Intel.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...40320.html
Quote:Intel's Core i9-9900KS, which the company says will hit 5.0 GHz on all-cores, is going to be released in October. Vice president of tech leadership marketing Jon Carvill and chief performance strategist Ryan Shrout revealed that in a meeting with press here in Berlin ahead of IFA, while also hinting at Cascade Lake-X and discussing its position in mobile as its 10th Gen chips hit the market.
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https://www.extremetech.com/computing/29...ade-lake-x
Quote:A faster Core i9 will undoubtedly improve Intel’s positioning against the Ryzen 7 and Ryzen 9 family, but even a chip that could hold an all-core 5GHz boost won’t catch the 12-core/24-thread Ryzen 9 3900X in most multi-threaded applications that can scale up to 12 cores. The gap between the two parts is too large to be closed in such a manner.

What the 9900KS will do for Intel, however, is give it a little more room to maneuver in gaming performance, which is where the company is making its stand. On the desktop side of things, Intel is facing a genuinely tough competitive situation, and even the advent of 10-core desktop CPUs may not solve the problem.
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https://www.neowin.net/news/motherboard-...ks-support
Quote:Motherboard manufacturers have begun to release firmware updates to add support for Intel's Core i9-9900KS processor. The CPU is like a turbo-charged Core i9-9900K that is capable of running all 8 cores at 5GHz. The CPU is due for release next month so it isn't at all surprising to see motherboard makers starting release BIOS revisions for the 9900KS.

ASRock and ASUS are first to be out of the gate with the updates and it is likely that other vendors will soon be following suit.
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Unsurprisingly, so far it's only the flagship Z390 chipset models that are getting this update as the 5GHz i9-9900KS will most likely require excellent VRM cooling, considering a constant high core voltage will be pushed through the VRMs to sustain such high clocks.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...40432.html
Quote:Although these newfound specs didn't come directly from Intel's mouth, Asus is more than a reliable source. Unless it was a typing error (or Asus is just plain incorrect), the i9-9900KS should arrive with a 127W TDP, which is 33.68% higher than its counterpart. Russian retailer DNS Shop seems to confirm the informatio, as it also listed the i9-9900KS with the same value. We'll just have to wait for Intel to confirm.

A 127W TDP rating is the highest we've seen for an Intel mainstream desktop processor for sure. It's even higher than the forthcoming 10-core Comet Lake-S chip that's rumored to feature a 125W TDP. In that case, we don't expect every Intel 300-series motherboard on the market to support the i9-9900KS. Perhaps the budget H310 or B360 motherboards could house the i9-9900KS, but the processor's performance would likely be restricted. You would probably need a high-end Z370 or Z390 motherboard to fully unlock the i9-9900KS's performance.
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-...40565.html
Quote:In yet another sign of the mounting pressure from AMD's Ryzen 3000-series chips, the company announced today that it would drop the pricing of its graphics-less F-series chips up to 20%, marking the first time the company has reduced pricing on existing chips in recent memory.
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Although the F-series chips officially sported the same recommended prices as Intel's fully-functional models, they've been a little cheaper in practice. Those savings have normally fallen in the $20 range. It's hard to tell if Intel's reduction in official pricing will result in further savings at retail, but it's logical to expect retail pricing to drop further.
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The price cuts are effective today for Intel's 9th-generation F-Series processors that are already in the market.
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