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Sonos Threatens To End Product Functionality If Users Don't Accept New Privacy Policy
#1
http://www.zdnet.com/article/sonos-accep...-function/
Ugh.
Quote:Sonos has confirmed that existing customers will not be given an option to opt out of its new privacy policy, leaving customers with sound systems that may eventually "cease to function".

It comes as the home sound system maker prepares to begin collecting audio settings, error data, and other account data before the launch of its smart speaker integration in the near future.
More security news

A spokesperson for the home sound system maker told ZDNet that, "if a customer chooses not to acknowledge the privacy statement, the customer will not be able to update the software on their Sonos system, and over time the functionality of the product will decrease."

"The customer can choose to acknowledge the policy, or can accept that over time their product may cease to function," the spokesperson said.

News of the changes was announced to customers in an email last week.
Valve hater, Nintendo hater, Microsoft defender, AMD hater, Google Fiber hater, 4K lover, net neutrality lover.
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#2
(08-23-2017, 08:42 AM)SteelCrysis Wrote: http://www.zdnet.com/article/sonos-accep...-function/
Ugh.
Quote:Sonos has confirmed that existing customers will not be given an option to opt out of its new privacy policy, leaving customers with sound systems that may eventually "cease to function".

It comes as the home sound system maker prepares to begin collecting audio settings, error data, and other account data before the launch of its smart speaker integration in the near future.
More security news

A spokesperson for the home sound system maker told ZDNet that, "if a customer chooses not to acknowledge the privacy statement, the customer will not be able to update the software on their Sonos system, and over time the functionality of the product will decrease."

"The customer can choose to acknowledge the policy, or can accept that over time their product may cease to function," the spokesperson said.

News of the changes was announced to customers in an email last week.

Lee was the main guy at the EFF that came to my rescue:


Lee Tien, a senior staff attorney at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, said it was a "growing" problem among the consumer electronics space.

"[Device] makers obviously can do a lot about the problem," said Tien. "They can design their systems to separate more data collection side from product feature. Obviously some features don't work without data but even so, you can often choose to store data locally and not transmit it to some mothership somewhere."

"Society as a whole continues down a path where devices in your home, traditionally our most private space, are largely controlled by other people who want to know what you're doing," he said.
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#3
Meanwhile here is another Company infringing on people:

8-23-2017

Popular Weather App AccuWeather Caught Sending User Location Data, Even When Location Sharing is Off
[url=https://apple.slashdot.org/story/17/08/22/1640255/popular-weather-app-accuweather-caught-sending-user-location-data-even-when-location-sharing-is-off?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Slashdot%2Fslashdot+%28Slashdot%29][/url]


Popular weather app AccuWeather has been caught sending geolocation data to a third-party data monetization firm, even when the user has switched off location sharing.

AccuWeather is one of the most popular weather apps in Apple's app store, with a near perfect four-star rating and millions of downloads to its name. But what the app doesn't say is that it sends sensitive data to a firm designed to monetize user locations without users' explicit permission.

Security researcher Will Strafach intercepted the traffic from an iPhone running the latest version of AccuWeather and its servers and found that even when the app didn't have permission to access the device's precise location, the app would send the Wi-Fi router name and its unique MAC address to the servers of data monetization firm Reveal Mobile every few hours.

That data can be correlated with public data to reveal an approximate location of a user's device. We independently verified the findings, and were able to geolocate an AccuWeather-running iPhone in our New York office within just a few meters, using nothing more than the Wi-Fi router's MAC address and public data.
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