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Ryzen APU Thread
#1
Let's kick it off: https://www.techpowerup.com/238175/amd-r...n-detailed
Quote:While "Summit Ridge" is the combination of two "Zen" CCX (quad-core CPU complex) units making up an 8-core CPU die that lacks integrated graphics, the "Raven Ridge" silicon combines one "Zen" CCX with an integrated graphics core based on the "Vega" architecture. AMD's new Infinity Fabric interconnect ferries data between the CCX and the iGPU, and not an internal PCIe link. The CCX houses four "Zen" CPU cores with 64 KB of L1I cache, 32 KB of L1D cache, 512 KB of dedicated L2 cache, and 4 MB of L3 cache shared between the four cores.

The integrated graphics core is a different beast. It features similar (albeit scaled-down) front-end and back-ends from the "Vega 10" silicon, a similar video engine, and an SIMD area with 10 "Vega" next-gen compute units (NGCUs). This works out to a stream processor count of 640. Other key specifications include 40 TMUs, and 16 ROPs.

The video engine is now extremely capable, supporting hardware-accelerated decoding of CODECs such as VP9 10-bpc and HEVC 10-bpc at frame-rates of up to 240 for 1080p, and 60 for 4K UHD. It can also encode H.265 8-bpc at frame-rates of up to 120 at 1080p, and 30 at 4K UHD. You finally get to use the display connectors on your socket AM4 motherboards, as the iGPU supports DisplayPort 1.4 and HDMI 2.0b, with resolutions of up to 3840 x 2160 @ 60 Hz with HDR, 1440p @ 144 Hz, and 1080p @ 240 Hz.
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AMD seems so have increased the amount of power-gating on its silicon. Disabled or idling components triggered by lower power-states, are now power-gated (their power-supply cut off), and not clock-gated (their clock cadence cut-off). The chip is peppered with multiple LDO (low-dropout regulator) regions for the CCX, iGPU, and uncore regions, with a common VDD package rail for both the off-chip (on motherboard) and on-chip voltage controllers.
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#2
https://techreport.com/news/32962/rumor-...eaks-cover
Quote:One chip that isn't on the road map that MoePC got ahold of is an as-yet-unknown AMD "Fenghuang" APU with "15FF" graphics. This product found its way into the SiSoft results database recently. The 15FF IGP apparently has 28 Radeon compute units for a total of 1792 shader processors, accompanied by 2 GB of an unknown type of VRAM. Other data that made its way into the database would appear to be spurious, like the 555-MHz clock speed, 16kB of L2 cache, and a supposed 32-bit path to memory. There isn't much in the way of details about this chip, but it definitely appears to be a prototype. Still, if it is real, Fenghuang's IGP would represent a considerable increase in graphics resources over today's Vega 8 and Vega 10 IGPs. The power needed to support that much graphics horsepower could peg this chip as a desktop part, but we won't know either way until AMD offers more details, if it ever does.
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#3
They've been announced: https://www.techpowerup.com/240370/amd-l...es-roadmap
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#4
AMD releases specifications: https://www.techpowerup.com/240834/amd-r...ridge-apus
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#5
https://www.techpowerup.com/241107/vario...ugh-3dmark
Quote:The entire Ryzen "Raven Ridge" APU lineup was put through 3DMark 11 "Performance" preset, by someone with access to all of them. The 2400G leads the pack with 5,162 points, and a graphics score of 5,042 points. The 2200G, which features 512 stream processors, and lacks SMT, manages 4,151 points, with 3,950 points graphics score. The 2400G scores somewhere between the desktop RX 550 and the RX 560, which makes it possible for you to run "Player Unknown's Battlegrounds" at 900p or even 1080p with some details dialed down.
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#6
MSI has released UEFIs with support for Ryzen APUs: https://www.techpowerup.com/241298/msi-o...pu-support
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#7
ASRock also releases UEFIs with support for Ryzen APUs: https://www.techpowerup.com/241356/asroc...-new-label
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#8
Mysterious Ryzen APU found: https://www.techpowerup.com/241372/myste...a-database
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#9
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-...67-11.html
https://www.extremetech.com/computing/26...-ever-seen
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/...11/11.html
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/...11/12.html
https://www.techpowerup.com/241444/amd-r...-interface
The summary of all of these is that Ryzen APUs will play 720p to 1080p at low to high settings, and still won't come close to an RX 460 or a GTX 1050, though they are roughly equal to a GT 1030 or an RX 550. On top of all of this, Ryzen APUs only have 8x PCIe 3.0 lanes available for graphics cards.
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#10
Quote:On top of all of this, Ryzen APUs only have 8x PCIe 3.0 lanes available for graphics cards.
Ironic given that Intel is always portrayed as the big bad monster plotting to take away PCI-E for graphics cards!
Adam knew he should have bought a PC but Eve fell for the marketing hype.

Homeopathy is what happened when snake oil salesmen discovered that water is cheaper than snake oil.

The reason they call it the American Dream is because you have to be asleep to believe it. -- George Carlin
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#11
(02-12-2018, 10:34 PM)SteelCrysis Wrote: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-...67-11.html
https://www.extremetech.com/computing/26...-ever-seen
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/...11/11.html
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/...11/12.html
https://www.techpowerup.com/241444/amd-r...-interface
The summary of all of these is that Ryzen APUs will play 720p to 1080p at low to high settings, and still won't come close to an RX 460 or a GTX 1050, though they are roughly equal to a GT 1030 or an RX 550. On top of all of this, Ryzen APUs only have 8x PCIe 3.0 lanes available for graphics cards.

They are impressive APUs. AMD has to walk a narrow line, serving more gaming needs than intel, but not undercutting their GPU and console market.
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#12
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-...,5464.html
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-...,5464.html
Quote:It is also interesting that AMD uses heat-conducting paste instead of solder between its Raven Ridge dies and heat spreaders. However, with an average power dissipation of less than 100W, this cost-cutting measure is probably tolerable for everyday operation. Of course, we also ran a series of more demanding workloads to tax both processors. It comes as little surprise that we figured out how to get the 2400G to throttle. We weren't expecting, however, to get its Radeon Vega Graphics engine stuck that way.
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All of this wouldn’t really be worth writing about if it wasn’t for the fact that Ryzen keeps on throttling, even after the conditions that caused throttling in the first place are relaxed. A reboot is necessary to reset the chip's operating parameters. There’s no rhyme or reason to this, and AMD can't explain it.

The good news, however, is that both of AMD's new Ryzen processors can be cooled without any issues using the company's bundled Wraith Stealth cooler. We used a number of especially demanding workloads to push these chips as hard as possible. But that's above and beyond what they'll encounter outside of the lab.
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#13
AMD announces the release of Ryzen APUs: https://www.neowin.net/news/the-first-ry...sale-today I checked Newegg and they don't have them yet. Edit: one of them is in the Ryzen 3 category, and Newegg is issuing partial refunds for overpricing Ryzen APUs: https://www.techpowerup.com/241525/neweg...-customers
Strange, since the Ryzen 3 2200G is still selling above its MSRP of $99.99 https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a...6819113481
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#14
Motherboards with old UEFIs won't even boot with Ryzen APUs, so AMD is having to label which motherboards are ready to go out of the box: https://techreport.com/news/33245/psa-ol...ryzen-apus
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#15
AMD provides some more options regarding motherboards with old UEFIs: https://www.techpowerup.com/241559/amd-p...-available
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#16
This review mentions that the Ryzen 5 2400G is replacing the Ryzen 5 1400: http://www.legitreviews.com/amd-ryzen-5-..._202691/10
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#17
AMD goes even farther to fix UEFI issues, promising to send affected users new Ryzen APUs for free that aren't affected by the UEFI issues: https://www.extremetech.com/computing/26...date-issue
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#18
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-...475-2.html
Quote:Our thermal data yields a couple of surprises. First, the paste that AMD uses between its die and heat spreader performs better than we believe a lot of enthusiasts were expecting. Second, it'd be hard for anyone to improve on the stock configuration, since the paste is applied so thinly to the heat spreader during production.

Gluing the heat spreader under pressure furthermore ensures an optimal result. When we carefully removed the original layer of thermal paste, we took note of how much AMD used and replicated its effort with our own high-quality stuff. Upon removing the heat spreader a second time, we confirmed that our application looked just about as perfect as AMD's.

Nevertheless, we did not succeed in achieving a noticeable advantage over the original paste's performance. Not even a burn-in over several hours helped to significantly improve our findings. The hotter Ryzen 5 2400G became, the smaller the already tiny difference got. In addition, when we used the boxed cooler, both applications of thermal paste failed to keep AMD's chip from hitting its thermal limit with Prime95 and MSI Kombustor running. Naturally, then, replacing the stock paste with another silicone-based paste is pointless. AMD makes the best of its position by achieving optimal performance within the framework of industrial mass production and pressure to cut costs.
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#19
Ryzen runs hot with the IGP, just as I would expect with Vega integrated. No overclocking improvement, either. For that I guess we have to wait for Zen+, if it even happens.
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#20
(02-19-2018, 10:35 PM)SickBeast Wrote: Ryzen runs hot with the IGP, just as I would expect with Vega integrated.  No overclocking improvement, either.  For that I guess we have to wait for Zen+, if it even happens.
What's worse is that APUs, and gaming on integrated graphics, are stuck at the same place where they were when AMD introduced the APU: insufficient for 1080p on modern games.
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#21
(02-17-2018, 04:43 AM)SteelCrysis Wrote: AMD goes even farther to fix UEFI issues, promising to send affected users new Ryzen APUs for free that aren't affected by the UEFI issues: https://www.extremetech.com/computing/26...date-issue
Update to this: the comments mention that the new APU is only intended for getting the UEFI updated so that your old APU works, then you have to send back the new APU.
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#22
(02-19-2018, 11:05 PM)SteelCrysis Wrote:
(02-19-2018, 10:35 PM)SickBeast Wrote: Ryzen runs hot with the IGP, just as I would expect with Vega integrated.  No overclocking improvement, either.  For that I guess we have to wait for Zen+, if it even happens.
What's worse is that APUs, and gaming on integrated graphics, are stuck at the same place where they were when AMD introduced the APU: insufficient for 1080p on modern games.

AMD must have signed an agreement with Sony stating that they were not allowed to release the PS4 APU for PC use. That would have made an amazing entry level PC gaming product.
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#23
(02-20-2018, 02:05 AM)SickBeast Wrote: AMD must have signed an agreement with Sony stating that they were not allowed to release the PS4 APU for PC use.  That would have made an amazing entry level PC gaming product.
Yes, but Intel had no such restrictions. Broadwell was an amazing first step for iGPU development. If Intel had stuck with it, they could have started to compete with AMD and Nvidia without having to actually develop their own graphics cards. But Intel threw away all of that progress, and now they're having to hire Koduri just to get somewhere.
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#24
(02-20-2018, 02:17 AM)SteelCrysis Wrote:
(02-20-2018, 02:05 AM)SickBeast Wrote: AMD must have signed an agreement with Sony stating that they were not allowed to release the PS4 APU for PC use.  That would have made an amazing entry level PC gaming product.
Yes, but Intel had no such restrictions. Broadwell was an amazing first step for iGPU development. If Intel had stuck with it, they could have started to compete with AMD and Nvidia without having to actually develop their own graphics cards. But Intel threw away all of that progress, and now they're having to hire Koduri just to get somewhere.

Can they not build upon what they already have with Broadwell?
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#25
(02-20-2018, 03:11 AM)SickBeast Wrote: Can they not build upon what they already have with Broadwell?
Yeah, but they will have to start now. If they had not abandoned development of Broadwell, then they could have started in 2015 with no need to develop graphics cards, and no need to hire Koduri. The result would have been iGPUs that could actually place meaningful pressure on AMD and Nvidia, all within Intel's usual CPU package. It was a golden opportunity, and Intel wasted it.
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#26
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/test...508-5.html
Quote:We don’t necessarily recommend using a Ryzen 5 2400G for Windows Mixed Reality. Because even though headset prices have fallen (in some cases below the $250 mark), and performance graphics card pricing remains sky high, most users looking to get into the VR space probably don't want to invest several hundred dollars on a system with serious limitations. But our experience with AMD's Raven Ridge chip opened our eyes to the possibility that we may soon have access to chips with integrated graphics that are powerful enough for the demanding workload of immersive VR experiences. We wouldn’t be surprised if AMD gives its second-generation Ryzen APUs enough oomph to drive high-quality VR content. At that point, PC-based VR gaming will have a better chance of gaining mainstream traction than in the current world where highly overpriced graphics cards are required.

This experiment also gives us hope that we’ll eventually see VR on the Xbox One platform. Two years ago, Microsoft introduced the Xbox Scorpio project and said that the new console would support virtual reality. When the company dropped the new console (now called Xbox One X), it stopped talking about VR on the Xbox platform. But we always expected that the Windows Mixed Reality platform and the Xbox One platforms would eventually come together to offer a mainstream living room VR gaming experience. Microsoft's Windows Mixed Reality runs surprisingly well on a mainstream chip like the Ryzen 5 2400G without official support or optimization. So we have to image that the two companies, working together, could deliver a more-satisfying experience with the powerful SoC in the Xbox One X.
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#27
https://www.techpowerup.com/245252/amd-r...-whql-only
Quote:AMD's latest Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition 18.6.1 Beta, which is available now, lacks Raven Ridge APU support. Driver support for the APUs are limited to WHQL releases only, as noted by an AMD representative on the Overclockers UK forum. Currently AMD is set to use a three month release cycle for APU drivers. Understandably, this has caused some concern with the latest driver to offer support for the Raven Ridge APUs being the Adrenalin Edition 18.5.1 driver released in May. The only good news here is the limited driver releases allow AMD to further optimize their costs in regards to testing and qualification.

Limited or outdated drivers, with such a long period between releases, means games could perform sub-optimally on AMD's latest and greatest APUs. Worse yet, consumers could be stuck waiting three months for an updated driver. Even then, if a problem arises and is a fringe issue, fixes could take even longer. Essentially Raven Ridge owners are being left out in the cold to some extent in regards to hot-fixes and performance improvements. This makes AMD's Raven Ridge APUs with built in VEGA graphics for both desktops and mobile systems a bit less appealing. This issue is further exacerbated by the fact Intel's Kaby Lake G series which also features AMD's VEGA graphics has seen a new driver released that is based on the 18.6.1 driver.
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