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AMD's Fortunes Are Improving
#41
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-cp...40453.html
Quote:It's well known at this point that Ryzen is fueling AMD's rise against Intel in the do-it-yourself PC market. We recently reported on the effect Ryzen 3000 had on AMD's sales at Mindfactory, one of Germany's most popular internet retailers, and now reddit user ingebor (who has compiled all of the Mindfactory data we've covered thus far) has charted sales data over the past five years that provides an incredible overview of AMD's rise since 2017.
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Though this data might not reflect the sales data of other retailers of other countries or even other German retailers, it's highly likely other retailers are seeing higher than normal AMD sales and lower than normal Intel sales, even if Intel is still the market leader. We're very excited to see these interesting developments in the CPU space, competition is good for the consumer, and we're looking forward to the next round of competition as Intel and AMD are both poised to make big launches in both the HEDT and mainstream segments before the end of the year.

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-ep...40454.html
Quote:Earlier this week, AMD announced its performance-focused EPYC Rome 7H12, which is essentially an EPYC 7742 with a much higher all-core clock speed (which is made possible due to increased power consumption). AMD announced the EPYC 7H12 alongside Atos's watercooled BullSequana supercomputer, and almost immediately Atos started setting more EPYC performance records.

According to Atos and AMD, BullSequana set four new records in the SPEC CPU 2017 benchmark suite, all of which were previously held by AMD's EPYC 7742. Thanks to its higher clock speeds, the 7H12 packs about 11% more TFLOPs of performance than the 7742, though that only equated to a few percentage points of extra performance in the SPEC benchmarks. Nonetheless, the 7H12 could easily be as much as 11% faster in other benchmarks or types of workloads.
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#42
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-li...40465.html
Quote:Fortune named AMD president and CEO Lisa Su one of the most powerful women in business. Su is not only the first woman to lead the 50-year-old AMD, but also the only woman leading a major semiconductor company at the moment, and she's led AMD's resurgence in the CPU market.
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#43
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-in...40488.html
Quote:According to DigiTimes, AMD has won significant orders from major enterprise data center players, including Dell, IBM and Nokia. AMD is now expected to represent 10% market share by the end of 2020, which would be roughly 10-fold more than before Epyc.
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#44
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/micros...40531.html
Quote:Microsoft announced today at its launch event that it has infused its Surface Laptop 3 with new "AMD Ryzen Surface Edition" processors that consist of custom AMD APUs with Radeon RX Vega GPUs specifically tailored for the new 6th-gen Microsoft laptop. The new AMD processors will come in some 15" Surface Laptop 3 models, while Intel's 10th-gen 10nm Ice Lake processors will power both 13.5" and 15" models.

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-in...40527.html
Quote:The supply issues that have been persistent in the Ryzen 3000 series since launch seem to be dissipating, and that has allowed AMD to keep the pressure on Intel.

AMD has reached a new record for market share on German retailer Mindfactory; the new record of 81% market share topped the previous record set in July when Ryzen 3000 launched.
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There is still clearly untapped demand for Ryzen 3000 CPUs and if AMD can solve these supply issues sooner rather than later, they may be able to inflict significant damage on Intel's bottom line as the next generation of Intel CPUs closes in. You'll also notice that Intel's chips have been slowly declining in retail pricing over time, which is another impact of Ryzen's success. However, if Intel is fully prepared to launch its next-gen CPUs before AMD can satisfy the market, they can also inflict damage on AMD's bottom line.

In either case, the two CPU vendors are now engaged in an intensifying price war, which benefits everyone.
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#45
https://www.extremetech.com/computing/29...-beginning
Quote:Last week, Microsoft and AMD announced that a new AMD APU would power the 15-inch Surface Laptop intended for the consumer market (there’s also an Ice Lake variant built for corporations). It’s a unique chip, with 11 Vega graphics units in a 15W TDP, when all of AMD’s other parts in this segment have either 10 GPU units in 15W or 11 units in 35W. The “Surface Edition” APU is a modest tweak to AMD’s existing product stack — but it’s also apparently just the beginning of what looks like a sustained hardware collaboration effort between the two companies.

That’s the word from Anandtech, which interviewed two AMD executives, Jack Huynh and Sebastien Nussbaum. According to them, AMD is working with Microsoft on a multi-year product life cycle that covers multiple hardware generations, as well as multiple products. The reason Microsoft used a relatively modest Ryzen CPU is that’s the chip AMD knew it would have available when Microsoft and AMD started the design process over two years ago.
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That’s why this product placement is such a big deal. It’s a subtle thing, but it’s precisely the opposite of how AMD products are typically treated. This kind of higher-profile placement still demands that the products justify the price, but AMD is finally winning acknowledgment for its products in their own right as opposed to being treated as the less-desirable default. It might not seem like a big thing for Microsoft to show AMD on the right-hand side of the page in comparison to Intel when doing spec sheet checks. It’s more important than you think.

If AMD can continue to deliver the hardware Microsoft is looking for, it has an opportunity to expand its own brand visibility and premium presence in a way that’s previously been very difficult for the company to achieve. It can then build on that foundation over successive product generations and take a shot at creating a new premium market for its own hardware in the process.
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#46
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/15-mil...-rome-cpus
Quote:The Archer supercomputer system based in Edinburgh was first introduced in 2013 based on the Cray XC30 design and has since been in use by researchers in need of serious compute power. It was once among the top 20 supercomputers in the world, but that’s no longer the case and the time has come to replace it.

As such, the center announced that it has contracted with Cray to build the Archer 2 supercomputer, which will be based on AMD EPYC Rome processors.
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The new win builds on an ever-expanding list of EPYC Rome supercomputer wins, including the recent announcement of the exascale-class Frontier supercomputer.
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#47
https://www.extremetech.com/computing/30...ttery-life
Quote:A normalized run-time of 10.54 hours is sufficient to knock out some of the Intel systems, including an 8550U without a dGPU, but it’s clear that AMD is still playing catch-up to Intel in terms of battery optimization. That’s not very surprising. AMD began putting a serious push on battery improvements relatively recently compared to Intel, which began focusing on this target market back in 2012 with its ultrabook initiative. Anandtech specifically notes that AMD has made major improvements over the Ryzen 2000 family, but still has a ways to go.

Everyone basically agrees that this is a major win for AMD. Securing a premium SKU in the Surface Laptop family will raise the visibility of the company’s solutions and encourage other OEMs to optimize for its products. Anandtech writes that: “Overall, the Surface Laptop 3 15 is a great laptop. It keeps all of the design cues of the smaller generation and just makes it a bit bigger, retaining the same thin & light design and keeping it easy to travel with. Microsoft has forged a solid partnership with AMD, and the Ryzen APU that’s at the heart of this laptop brings with it great GPU performance and good CPU performance, even though it is at the cost of overall battery life.”

The Verge is more circumspect in its approach. “Still, if you were hoping that the 15-inch Laptop 3 would be more than just a bigger Surface Laptop, I’m sorry to report that you’ll be disappointed. Fortunately, there are plenty of other, more powerful 15-inch laptops available, such as Apple’s MacBook Pro, Dell’s XPS 15, or even Microsoft’s own Surface Book 2. I don’t know if Microsoft needed to make a 15-inch version of the Surface Laptop, but it did, and it mostly did a good job with it.”

Gizmodo is the most positively-inclined towards the new AMD laptop, writing: “If you value portability and don’t need half a dozen CPU cores and a big discrete GPU, the Surface Laptop 3 is a rarity that hits a perfect balance I didn’t know I needed until I had it in my lap. AMD (and Microsoft) have produced a GPU and CPU seemingly as good as Intel’s very best. It’s absolute proof that AMD can and should start appearing in more laptops, especially the big flashy ones.”
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#48
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-vs...e-research
Quote:As reported by The Independent today, AMD CPUS were found in 7% of the 5.07 million systems that were shipped to European retailers and resellers in 2018. Those numbers have risen, with AMD's chips now being found in 12% of laptops and desktops, even as the total number of shipments rose to 5.24 million. That means shipments of AMD-powered systems rose from 355,000 units to 629,000 units in a year.

That growth was highest in the retail market, where AMD's share of shipments rose from 11% last year to 18% this year. Shipments of business-targeting PCs featuring AMD processors also jumped from 5% to 8%. It's not like Intel's majority share of the market is in danger--especially where business customers are concerned--but AMD's growth shows that companies are willing to consider other solutions.
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It's not clear when Intel will have enough CPUs to meet its customers' needs. The company's working to increase production, though, and that could be enough to slow AMD's rise. Manufacturers have made it clear that they want to use Intel's processors, and some have mostly turned to AMD's offerings out of desperation. What happens when they can once again buy as many of Intel's products as they want?
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#49
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-se...n-and-epyc
Quote:In our coverage of AMD's last earnings call we opined that it represented the calm before the 7nm storm, but today that storm made landfall as AMD posted its highest quarterly revenue since 2005 driven by its highest quarterly sales of client (desktop) PC chips since 2011. Overall, AMD posted $1.8 billion in revenue for the quarter, a 9% year-over-year gain.
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AMD's gross margins also improved to 43%, a 3% year-over-year gain.
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#50
https://www.extremetech.com/computing/30...since-2005
Quote:AMD expects to break $2B in revenue in Q4 2019, “an increase of 48 percent year-over-year and 17 percent sequentially.” This is despite the fact that semicustom is expected to continue to decline. In retrospect, AMD couldn’t have hoped for better timing as regards its server business. From 2012 to 2017, the PS4 and Xbox One basically kept AMD alive, injecting billions in revenue at a time when the company desperately needed it. Now, as the PS4 and Xbox One wind down, Epyc is already winding up, taking some of the sting out of that inevitable sales cycle. By the time the PS5 and Xbox Next launch in 2020, Epyc will be firing on all thrusters.

It’s clear that EESC will be the segment to watch 12 months from now. The combined impact of two console launches and improved server sales should drive significant revenue improvements in this segment. Intel’s own Q3 2019 was record-breaking, but both companies are openly acknowledging that the space between them is much more competitive than it used to be. But this is what the restoration of competition promised between the two companies, and it’s what we’re seeing today. AMD’s fortunes are improving. It’s paying down long term debt and improving its own net cash position. Long-term debt has fallen from $1.7B in Q4 2017 to roughly $1.1B today.

All in all, an excellent quarter.
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#51
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/netfli...on-servers
Quote:Netflix's data center engineering team took on a mission recently to double the encrypted video bandwidth of the video streaming company from 100 Gbps to about 200 Gbps. The company reached its goal on both Intel and AMD-powered servers, with the AMD Epyc servers seeing triple the bandwidth compared to before.
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Once the Netflix team applied all the optimizations they could, the single-socket Epyc server was able to catch-up and even slightly surpass the dual-socket Xeon server, tripling its initial performance from 68 Gbps to 194 Gbps (compared to an ultimate 191 Gbps for Xeon).

The Netflix team did criticize AMD for not yet having well-developed tools for server operating systems, such as Linux. However, with the rise in popularity of AMD’s Epyc server chip platform, we can expect AMD to invest much more aggressively in the development of its tools.
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#52
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-vs...war-begins
Quote:Mercury Research, a CPU market analyst firm, released its market share report today, which highlights AMD's recent gains against Intel. The last quarterly share report did not include sales from AMD's Ryzen 3000 processors, but this report reflects 7nm processor sales as the company continues to claw back market share from Intel.

The report highlights that AMD grew in all segments, including desktop PCs, mobile, server, and the overall x86 market, fueled by the rise of AMD's Ryzen 3000 processors that offer a more advanced manufacturing process than Intel's 14nm chips. That affords density, power, performance, and pricing advantages.
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In an interview at the Bernstein summit this morning, AMD CTO Mark Papermaster shed some light on the situation. Papermaster said the company met with unanticipated demand for high-end products and reiterated that TSMC supply shortages weren't the root of the problem. In response to a question about the shortages, Papermaster responded that the problem boiled down to binning for higher-performance CPU models. That means AMD wasn't yielding enough high-end chips from each wafer to satisfy demand for its fastest chips, but the company says it has adjusted to ensure supply.
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It appears that AMD is headed in the right direction on all fronts, though Intel's dominant market position makes for slow progress. In the near term, Intel is ready to exploit its advantage of incumbency and sheer scale to slow AMD's progress, primarily through price cuts rather than innovative new products. We'll have to wait until next year to see the fruits of Intel's Comet Lake labors, but they largely look to be yet another iteration of the 14nm Skylake architecture. Without some severe price cuts, that isn't going to be enough to hold AMD back from stealing significantly more market share in the DIY and enthusiast markets.

AMD's EPYC Rome is also slowly gaining steam, and while it isn't a critical selling point for the client market, Intel's lack of PCIe 4.0 support is too hard to ignore for many high-performance applications, like in supercomputing and HPC. Those systems will be obsolete long before their expected shelf life of five years due to the now-bottlenecked interface. That's why we see AMD nearly running the table in HPC and supercomputer wins. All this means we can expect some drastic price adjustments to Intel's forthcoming server chips, too.
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#53
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-vs...war-begins
Quote:Update: Dean McCarron at Mercury Research shared updated numbers for AMD's total market share of the x86 market, which we've added to the relevant section. McCarron also provided some commentary on the report, which we also added to the total market share section.

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-un...hlon-3000g
Quote:Today AMD announced that its belated $749 Ryzen 9 3950X will barrel into the desktop PC market on November 25 with 16-cores and 32-threads for mainstream platforms. The company also dished fine-grained details, like cooling and motherboard requirements, for the new processors.
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The 3950X drops into the standard AM4 socket on X570, X470, and B450 motherboards, though it would be wise to assure the motherboard has adequate power circuitry. AMD says that the Ryzen 9 3950X has only been validated for its new 1.0.0.4B AGESA, which motherboard vendors are rolling out for existing motherboards (via a firmware update) over the course of this month. AMD strongly recommends that all users migrate to the new motherboard firmware revisions.

The new firmwares include many of the fixes we've seen for AMD's boost clock algorithms, along with even more refinements that reportedly include faster boot times. This new BIOS also unifies all the Ryzen models under the same codebase, so there won't be any more split support for some older models.
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#54
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/tencen...mprovement
Quote:Today AMD announced that it had formed a partnership with Tencent, the largest Chinese data center operator, and said it would provide Tencent with Epyc Rome CPUs for Tencent's new "Star Lake server platform" (no relation to Intel). This is yet another win for AMD after winning several supercomputers, and companies that haven't already invested into AMD's server CPUs are certainly looking into it.
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Rome's ability to handle basically all of Tencent's needs is a big victory. The company hosts China's most expansive data center with 1.1 million servers and continues to deploy more.

Tencent didn't share any figures for the number of chips it will deploy, but AMD will likely at least be Tencent's provider for future server deployments, and perhaps Tencent will even replace some of its existing servers with its Star Lake servers. It certainly cannot be understated how impressive the adoption of Rome has been, especially given the sluggishness of large data centers to adopt new architectures.
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#55
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amds-l...oomberg-50
Quote:Bloomberg named AMD CEO Lisa Su one of its "Bloomberg 50" today. While that sounds like a list of the people most likely to be modified clones of Michael Bloomberg, it's actually supposed to honor "the people who defined 2019" across a variety of vital sectors, "from finance to fashion and technology to trade."

https://www.techpowerup.com/261808/amids...ternatives
Quote:Dell has already had some products based on AMD designs, but most of the company's lineups, irrespective of market, are based on Intel platforms. That they are considering AMD is obvious; all other makers are surely doing that, especially considering the overall value proposition from AMD CPUs. Dell CFO Tom Sweet, for one, told yahoo Finance that they are "Evaluating AMD" as a partner, and that they expect Intel's shortages to only by fixed by the second half of 2020. Should AMD be able to entrench themselves as a viable alternative (which they already are; but companies do take their business relations seriously, and they would do so even more when it comes to Intel), then they could carve themselves a space that would then be difficult for Intel to recover. or, of course, this news may serve only as a way for Dell and other manufacturers to put some pressure on Intel to achieve better materials acquisition deals - Intel is bound to be eager not to let AMD penetrate the market as much as their chips deserve to.
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